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Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary August 2005
[Summaries and Track Data] [Prepared by Gary Padgett]


                   MONTHLY GLOBAL TROPICAL CYCLONE SUMMARY

                                AUGUST, 2005
                                

  (For general comments about the nature of these summaries, as well as
  information on how to download the tabular cyclone track files, see
  the Author's Note at the end of this summary.)

  *************************************************************************

  EXTRA FEATURE - REPORT ON SEVERE SOUTH AMERICAN EXTRATROPICAL CYCLONES
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following report is based on information sent to the author by
  Alexandre Aguiar and Eugenio Hackbart of the Metsul Climatologia Urbana
  Weather Center in Porto Alegre, Brazil.   A special thanks to these
  fellows for sending the information (as well as damage photos, which
  unfortunately can't be included here in a strictly text file) on these
  unusually intense extratropical cyclones which affected their corner of
  the world during August and early September.

  A. Storm #1
  -----------

     On August 9 an extratropical cyclone affected Florianopolis, the 
  capital of the state of Santa Catarina in Brazil.  One weather station
  in the Arvoredo Island, right off the coast, registered gusts of 140 kph
  (76 kts).  In the Florianopolis Hercilio Luz Airport the wind gusted to
  90 kph (49 kts) and was strong enough to move airplanes.  Large areas of
  the city remained without power for up to two days and many trees were
  blown down.


  B. Storm #2
  -----------

     The most astonishing event took place on the night of August 23rd in
  Uruguay.  The national capital, Montevideo, was hit by winds of almost
  200 km/h (109 kts) due to another extratropical cyclone.   It was the
  worst storm to affect Brazil's neighboring country since 1966.  Following
  is a wire from the Associated Press:

     "In Uruguay, a powerful storm system on the 23rd-24th produced 
  strong winds in excess of 160 km/hr (87 kts) in the departments 
  of Canelones, Montevideo, San Jose, Colonia and Maldonado, where 
  nearly 70 percent of the country's population live.  Thousands of 
  homes were damaged and around 20,000 people lost electricity and 
  telephone service.  Montevideo's international airport was 
  temporarily shut down late on the 23rd due to the high winds and 
  heavy rainfall.  There were seven people killed and dozens injured 
  (Associated Press/OCHA)." 

     A station located on the Harbor of Montevideo registered a gust of
  187 kph (102 kts).   Very similar wind gusts were also observed at 
  Montevideo's Carrasco International Airport with one gust reaching
  173 kph (94 kts).  Montevideo was affected by tropical storm-force 
  winds for over 12 hours and by hurricane-force winds for nearly 
  four hours.

     Local officials and private weather services were plunged into
  a crisis after the storm because just three hours before the high 
  winds a storm advisory pointed to winds of a maximum of 60 kph.  We 
  here in Brazil had issued an warning of 100+ kph winds for southern 
  Uruguay, but the warning never arrived to our Uruguayan pals as it 
  was published in Portuguese in a private weather institution in 
  another country.  Days after the storm we decided to contact local 
  weather services in Uruguay and initiate permanent cooperation for 
  the weather systems that affect Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost 
  state in Brazil, since they normally pass first through Uruguay.  In
  those contacts, Uruguayan meteorologists made dramatic descriptions of
  the storm.

     More than three thousand trees fell in the city of 1.5 million
  people and 10 people died.  Two died when a 100-meter FM radio station 
  tower collapsed onto houses and buildings.  Downtown high-rise buildings 
  were shaking during the storm and some news stands rolled over four
  blocks.  In ANTEL's Tower, the building that hosts the national phone
  company, a car was thrown by the winds into the front entrance.

    The low pressure system migrated from northern Argentina, crossed
  through southwest Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) and literally exploded
  in intensity over the waters of Rio de la Plata.  The lowest reported
  pressure was 991.7 hPa.  (Note: Extratropical cyclones in this part of
  the globe are common during fall, winter and spring months.  The winds
  usually peak to 80-110 kph (43-60 kts), but winds of 187 kph are very
  unusual.)

     For more on Uruguay's cyclone check the following URL:
    http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2005/aug/hazards.html#Extratropic>


  C. Storm #3
  -----------

     On September 2nd another extratropical cyclone affected South 
  America's South Cone.  This time our city and state were punished by 
  the winds.  In the metropolitan area of Porto Alegre power outages
  left many thousands of people without power.  Windows were blown in,
  and roughly 300 trees fell down.  In the coastal areas many homes were
  de-roofed and some injuries were reported.  The highest wind gust was
  observed in the weather station located in the harbor of Rio Grande, in
  the southern coast of the state: 111 kph (60 kts).  Near downtown Porto
  Alegre winds peaked at 100 kph (54 kts).

  *************************************************************************

                             AUGUST HIGHLIGHTS

   --> Hurricane causes greatest natural disaster in U. S. history
   --> Western Pacific active--several typhoon strikes in China and Japan
   --> Eastern North Pacific activity picks up

  *************************************************************************
  
                            ACTIVITY BY BASINS

  ATLANTIC (ATL) - North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico

  Activity for August:  1 tropical depression
                        3 tropical storms
                        1 hurricane
                        1 intense hurricane


                        Sources of Information
                        ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below was obtained from the
  various tropical cyclone products issued by the Tropical Prediction
  Center/National Hurricane Center (TPC/NHC) in Miami, Florida:
  discussions, public advisories, forecast/advisories, tropical weather
  outlooks, special tropical disturbance statements, etc.    Some
  additional information may have been gleaned from the monthly
  summaries prepared by the hurricane specialists and available on
  TPC/NHC's website.     All references to sustained winds imply a
  1-minute averaging period unless otherwise noted.


                   Atlantic Tropical Activity for August
                   -------------------------------------

     Tropical cyclone activity was above normal in August, although not at
  the pace seen in July.      Five tropical storms were named with two
  reaching hurricane intensity--of these, one became an intense hurricane
  (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir/Simpson scale).  The averages for
  the month of August (1950-2004) are: 2.8 named storms, 1.6 hurricanes,
  and 0.6 intense hurricanes.  The five August cyclones generated a Net
  Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) of 39%, somewhat above the August average
  NTC of 25%.  Even though the month was more active than normal, it fell
  far short of August of 2004's eight named storms, five hurricanes, three
  intense hurricanes and NTC of 85%--the most active month of August on
  record.

     The one thing August of 2004 didn't have, however, was a Hurricane
  Katrina.  This awesome storm became a large Category 5 hurricane in the
  central Gulf of Mexico after blasting southern Florida as an intensifying
  Category 1 hurricane.  Katrina's winds reached 150 kts and its central
  pressure dipped to 902 mb, at the time the 4th lowest pressure measured
  in an Atlantic hurricane.   However, as the season progressed, two more
  hurricanes would reach even lower pressures, pushing Katrina back to 6th
  place.  Katrina landed in southeastern Louisiana early on the morning of
  29 August as a severe Category 4 hurricane and later that day made a
  final landfall along the Mississippi coast as a Category 3 hurricane.
  Storm surge heights exceeding 30 feet completely obliterated or very
  heavily damaged all structures within several miles of the shoreline
  over much of the Mississippi coast.  In addition the surge in Lake
  Pontchartrain broke through levees protecting the below-sea-level city
  of New Orleans, resulting in 80% of that city being flooded.   Some
  damage estimates have exceeded a staggering $200 billion, and the death
  toll will likely exceed 1300.

     Of the remaining August cyclones, Tropical Storms Harvey and Lee and
  the rather long-lived Hurricane Irene remained out in the Atlantic, not
  affecting any land areas except for a brief brush with Bermuda by Harvey.
  Tropical Storm Jose, like Bret and Gert before it, formed in the Bay of
  Campeche and quickly moved westward into Mexico.   Jose, however, was
  slightly stronger than the two previous storms in this region.  Reports
  follow on all the named August systems.

     One other tropical depression formed during the month and was
  designated as Tropical Depression 10.   This system weakened before
  developing into a tropical storm, but its remnants contributed to the
  formation of Tropical Depression 12, which became the catastrophic
  Katrina.  The history of TD-10 is included in the Katrina report.
  Another well-defined tropical wave which crossed the Atlantic in late
  August produced winds at times exceeding gale force, but remained highly
  sheared and was not organized enough to warrant classification as a
  tropical depression.  This system preceded the system which ultimately
  became Tropical Storm Lee and possibly had some connection with Lee.  
  More information on the wave can be found in the report on Tropical 
  Storm Lee.

     Additional information, including satellite pictures and links, may
  be found at the following URL:

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_Atlantic_hurricane_season>



                          TROPICAL STORM HARVEY
                                 (TC-08)
                              2 - 12 August
                -----------------------------------------

     Tropical Storm Harvey was the earliest 8th Atlantic tropical storm
  on record, exceeding the previous one by about 1 1/2 weeks (15 August
  1936).  The cyclone formed from a tropical wave which exited the coast
  of Africa on 23 July.   The wave was first mentioned by TPC/NHC in a
  Tropical Weather Outlook at 1530 UTC on 26 July when it was located
  roughly 1200 nm east-southeast of the Windward Islands.  The wave
  continued westward, slowly increasing in organization.  By midday on
  the 29th an area of low pressure had formed in the northern Leeward
  Islands in association with the wave, but upper-level winds were not
  particularly favorable for development at the time.   The area of low-
  pressure crossed Hispaniola on the 30th and moved northward for a couple
  of days, but the associated convection weakened during this period.

     By the morning of 2 August a broad area of low pressure was centered
  approximately 415 nm southwest of Bermuda with a large area of convection
  to the north and east of an ill-defined center.  Upper-level winds had
  become more conducive for development, and the first advisory on Tropical
  Depression 08 was issued at 2100 UTC, placing the center about 300 nm
  southwest of Bermuda and moving northward at 11 kts.  The discussion
  bulletin noted that the system was not the most tropical of tropical
  cyclones and had some subtropical features.   Also, there were a number
  of small swirls rotating around a common center.   The cyclone still
  exhibited some subtropical characteristics on the morning of the 3rd,
  but the definition of the LLCC had improved over the previous day.
  QuikScat data indicated several unflagged 35-kt vectors, ship W6SOT
  reported 35-kt winds near the center at 1200 UTC, and Dvorak classi-
  fications from TAFB had reached T2.5 by 1200 UTC, so the depression
  was upgraded to Tropical Storm Harvey at 1500 UTC, located approximately
  185 nm west-southwest of Bermuda, moving north-northeastward at 9 kts.

     Only two aerial reconnaissance flights were made into Harvey.  The
  first around midday on 3 August found winds of 62 kts at 365 m in the
  southeast quadrant with a minimum CP of 999 mb.  Based on this, the
  MSW was upped to 50 kts in a special advisory at 1800 UTC.   Shortly
  after being named, Harvey's trajectory turned to the east-northeast
  and the cyclone passed about 40 nm south-southeast of Bermuda early on
  the 4th where sustained winds to 32 kts, gusting to 44 kts, were
  reported.   A morning reconnaissance mission (the final one into Harvey)
  found a CP of 995 mb, but the peak FLWs did not support an increase in
  intensity.  However, by 1500 UTC the cloud pattern had become much more
  typical of a tropical cyclone with most of the subtropical features of
  the previous day having disappeared.  With T-numbers at 3.0 and 3.5, the
  MSW was increased to its peak value of 55 kts.  The cyclone was then
  centered approximately 85 nm east of Bermuda and moving toward the east-
  northeast at 12 kts.     The 55-kt peak MSW was maintained for about
  24 hours before being dropped slightly to 50 kts.  Harvey's intensity
  fluctuated between 45 and 50 kts for the remainder of its life as a
  tropical cyclone.   Vertical shear was sufficiently inhibiting to prevent
  the cyclone from reaching hurricane intensity, and the LLCC for much of
  the time was either fully or partially-exposed.

     The east-northeastward motion continued through the 6th as Harvey was
  being moved along by a shortwave trough to the north.  That trough had
  lifted out by the 5th and the storm's motion slowed somewhat as the
  steering flow weakened.  The cyclone turned more to the northeast and
  began to accelerate on the 6th as the next shortwave in the westerlies
  off New England continued to push eastward.   Harvey moved along with
  this second shortwave trough, and as it began to move into cooler waters
  north of the Gulf Stream early on the 8th, the convection began to
  decrease notably.  The final TPC/NHC advisory on Tropical Storm Harvey
  was issued at 08/2100 UTC, placing the center about 465 nm southeast of
  Cape Race, Newfoundland.  The cloud pattern had become asymmetric and was
  beginning to merge with a mid-latitude cloud band.  The remnants of
  Harvey continued for several days as a large and powerful extratropical
  cyclone over the North Atlantic, finally losing its identity on the 14th.

     The Bermuda Naval Air Station at Kindley Field (32.4N/64.7W) recorded
  117.6 mm of rain between 03/1200 and 04/1200 UTC.

     A graphic displaying the track of Tropical Storm Harvey may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/ATLANTIC_NORTH/2005_08L_HARVEY.jpg>

     No casualties or damage are known to have resulted from Tropical
  Storm Harvey.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                             HURRICANE IRENE
                                 (TC-09)
                              4 - 18 August
                   -----------------------------------

     Hurricane Irene became the earliest 9th Atlantic tropical storm of the
  year when it was named on 7 August, besting the previous record for the
  earliest 9th storm set on 20 August 1936.  The cyclone developed from a
  tropical wave which left the west coast of Africa on 1 August.  TPC/NHC
  first mentioned this system in a Tropical Weather Outlook issued at
  1530 UTC on 3 August when it was located a few hundred miles west-
  southwest of the Cape Verde Islands.   Convection gradually increased
  in organization and advisories were initiated on Tropical Depression 09
  at 2100 UTC on 4 August when the poorly-defined center of the system
  was located about 600 nm west of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands.
  The depression was large with plenty of convective bands, excellent
  outflow and a burst of convection near the center.

     The depression was initially forecast to move westward and strengthen
  soon into a tropical storm.  However, it turned northwestward, a move
  which kept it over slightly cooler SSTs.  Also, the northwesterly track
  took the system into a region of westerly vertical shear.   Convection
  became very limited over the next few days due to the cooler SSTs, shear
  and dry air.   The depression was broad and poorly-organized, and
  multiple swirls were noted at times.   TD-09 continued to moved west-
  northwestward through a hostile environment for the first three days of
  its life as a tropical cyclone.   Late on the 6th the discussion bulletin
  noted that the depression was still strongly sheared and that Dvorak
  classifications could hardly support a T-number based on the distance
  between the center and the convection.   Early on 7 August the center
  reformed to the north and convection increased significantly near and
  east of the center with the cloud pattern resembling that of a sheared
  tropical storm.  A QuikScat pass at 07/0849 UTC revealed 40-kt vectors
  just outside the deep convection to the north of the center, and Dvorak
  numbers from TAFB and AFWA had reached T2.5.  Hence, Tropical Storm Irene
  was christened at 1500 UTC with the center located about 1000 nm east of
  the northern Leeward Islands.  Since the deep convection near the center
  as well as the organization had diminished since earlier in the morning,
  the initial advisory intensity was set at 35 kts.

     Irene barely held on to tropical storm intensity for 24 hours as the
  shear continued unabated, but by 1500 UTC on the 8th the signature had
  deteriorated to the point that the system was downgraded to a tropical
  depression.   Around the time of the downgrade the west-northwesterly
  track flattened out to more of a straight westerly one.  Irene sailed
  toward the west for a couple of days as a tropical depression.  Bursts
  of convection occurred occasionally and kept the system alive.  By the
  afternoon of 9 August, the cloud structure was becoming more symmetric
  and there were signs of some banding, but by early morning on the 10th
  there was considerable doubt as to whether or not the system still had a
  closed circulation.  But as the day progressed the cloud pattern again
  began to improve, and by 11/0000 UTC Dvorak estimates had reached a
  consensus 35 kts from all three satellite classification agencies.
  Hence, Irene was re-upgraded to tropical status at 11/0300 UTC when
  located roughly 600 nm south-southeast of Bermuda, moving west-
  northwestward at 11 kts.

     The revived Irene continued west-northwestward, passing roughly 280 nm
  south of Bermuda on the morning of 12 August.   The storm's track slowly
  became northwesterly, and Irene turned northward upon reaching the 70th
  meridian on the 14th--at 14/0600 UTC the cyclone was located about 280 nm
  west of Bermuda.   After being re-upgraded to tropical storm status,
  Irene slowly strengthened with the MSW reaching 60 kts by 12/1800 UTC.
  A reconnaissance aircraft investigating Irene reported a peak FLW of
  64 kts with a CP of 997 mb.   By the time Irene had reached the 35th
  parallel around 15/0000 UTC, it had begun to move toward the north-
  northeast.  A reconnaissance flight into the cyclone around this time
  found a peak FLW of 88 kts with an attendant CP of 989 mb.  This was the
  basis for upgrading Irene to the season's third hurricane at 15/0300 UTC,
  the center being then located about 280 nm northwest of Bermuda or about
  310 nm east of Cape Hatteras.

     By the morning of 15 August Irene was moving almost due eastward at
  around latitude 36.5N, a motion which persisted for the next two days.
  The eastward trajectory was very significant for Irene in that it kept
  it away from cooler SSTs and strong westerlies just to the north.  When
  upgraded to hurricane intensity, Irene was forecast to peak at 75 kts and
  begin to weaken after 36 hours.  Instead, the storm was able to hang on
  to hurricane intensity for almost three days and was able to strengthen
  into a Category 2 hurricane.  Irene's peak intensity was reached at
  1800 UTC on 16 August when centered approximately 720 nm southwest of
  Cape Race, Newfoundland.   Dvorak T-numbers at that time supported a
  MSW of 90 kts, and this value was reported in TPC/NHC's Monthly Tropical
  Weather Summary for August.  However, by advisory release time at 2100
  UTC, cloud tops had warmed somewhat and the eye had become less distinct,
  so the maximum advisory intensity for Irene was 85 kts.

     Shortly after reaching its peak intensity, Irene began to experience
  significant westerly shear, resulting in a steady decrease in intensity.
  The cyclone was downgraded to a tropical storm at 2100 UTC on 17 August.
  By this time Irene had accelerated toward the northeast:  at 17/1500 UTC
  the forward speed was 10 kts--24 hours later the storm was racing north-
  eastward at 40 kts.  The final TPC/NHC advisory on Irene was issued at
  18/1500 UTC, placing the center about 255 nm east-southeast of Cape Race.
  The storm was beginning to interact with a frontal zone and was rapidly
  losing tropical characteristics.   The remains of Irene were apparently
  quickly absorbed by a large extratropical LOW just east of Newfoundland.

     A graphic displaying the track of Hurricane Irene may be found at the
  following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/ATLANTIC_NORTH/2005_09L_IRENE.jpg>

     No casualties or damage are known to have resulted from Hurricane
  Irene.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                           TROPICAL STORM JOSE
                                 (TC-11)
                             22 - 23 August
                 ---------------------------------------

     Tropical Storm Jose continued the trend of setting a new earliest
  "n-th" storm record for the Atlantic basin.  The previous earliest
  10th tropical storm was Tropical Storm Jerry, which became a named storm
  on 23 August 1995.   Jose was named on the afternoon of 22 August,
  beating Jerry by one day.  According to the monthly summary prepared by
  the staff of TPC/NHC, Jose's origins lay in a tropical wave, but the
  earliest mention of the pre-Jose disturbance in a Tropical Weather
  Outlook was at 1530 UTC on 19 August, when a small area of disturbed
  weather was centered just east of the northeastern tip of Honduras,
  moving slowly west-northwestward.  The next couple of days saw this
  disturbance produce showers over the extreme northwestern Caribbean Sea
  and adjacent land areas as it continued slowly west-northwestward.  By
  the afternoon of 21 August an area of low-pressure had formed over the
  southwestern portion of the Yucatan Peninsula.

     Convection increased markedly on the morning of the 22nd over the
  Bay of Campeche, and upper-level winds appeared favorable for further
  development.  Satellite imagery, Mexican radar data, and QuikScat data
  indicated that a tropical depression was forming, and advisories were
  initiated on Tropical Depression 11 in a special advisory issued at
  1600 UTC.  The center of the developing cyclone was placed about 70 nm
  east-northeast of Veracruz, moving westward at 7 kts.  The initial MSW
  was estimated at 25 kts, and although the depression didn't appear to
  have much time over water, it was forecast to become a minimal tropical
  storm before landfall.  The intensity was increased to 30 kts in the
  2100 UTC advisory as the system was maintaining deep central convection
  and had an excellent outflow pattern aloft.

     A reconnaissance aircraft reached the system about this time and
  reported a maximum FLW at 305 m of 54 kts, supporting 45 kts at the
  surface.  The depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Jose in a special
  advisory issued at 2215 UTC.  Jose's center was fixed about 50 nm east-
  northeast of Veracruz, or about 140 nm southeast of Tuxpan, Mexico.
  Tropical Storm Jose continued moving steadily westward and made landfall
  around 23/0600 UTC about 80 nm south-southeast of Tuxpan.  Data from a
  radar at Alvarado, Mexico, indicated that the cyclone became better
  organized in the last two hours before landfall with an eye forming.
  However, the exact intensity of Jose before landfall remains unknown.  An
  hour or two before the eye began to form TRMM data showed that the center
  was partially-exposed and aircraft data indicated that peak winds were
  well below hurricane strength.   The storm was downgraded to a depression
  in the intermediate advisory at 23/1200 UTC, and the final advisory was
  issued at 1500 UTC, placing the center inland about 110 km east-northeast
  of Mexico City, moving westward at about 8 kts, or 15 km/hr.

     A graphic displaying the track of Tropical Storm Jose may be found at
  the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/ATLANTIC_NORTH/2005_11L_JOSE.jpg>
  
     The weakening Jose brought torrential rainfall to portions of Mexico.
  Jalapa, in Veracruz State, recorded 103.8 mm between 22/1200 and 23/1200
  UTC.  The heavy rains triggered landslides and flooding that forced
  thousands to evacuate their homes.  A 59-year-old man was killed in
  Jalapa when a mudslide buried his home.  In Misantla, about 70 km south-
  east of Jalapa, some 1500 residents were housed in seven makeshift
  shelters because the Misantla River was overflowing its banks.  Several
  others were rescued from their cars after becoming stranded along a
  flooded stretch of highway between Jalapa and Cardel.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                            HURRICANE KATRINA
                                 (TC-12)
                              23 - 31 August
                  -------------------------------------

  A. Introduction and Storm Origins
  ---------------------------------

     Hurricane Katrina was responsible for what will likely be recorded
  as the worst natural disaster in the history of the United States when it
  made landfall in extreme southeastern Louisiana and western Mississippi
  on the morning of 29 August.  A storm surge estimated at up to 10.7 m
  (35 ft) obliterated much of the signs of civilization along the coast
  of Mississippi, and the resurging waters of Lake Pontchartrain after
  the storm had passed broke through levees protecting New Orleans and
  left up to 80% of that large city flooded with waters exceeding 6 m
  (20 ft) in places.   Very severe surge-related damage was also inflicted
  on communities along the north shore of the large lake, including
  Slidell, Louisiana.   Some estimates of the economic impact of Katrina
  reported in the media have exceeded $200 billion, well over twice the
  damage from Hurricane Andrew and the four hurricanes of 2004 combined.
  As of the time of this writing, the death toll stands at well over
  1200, by far the deadliest U. S. hurricane since the great Palm Beach
  and Lake Okechobee hurricane of 1928.

     A tropical wave which left the coast of Africa in early August began
  to show some signs of life late on 11 August when it was located about
  1300 nm east of the Windward Islands.  An associated low-pressure area
  formed on the 12th and convection began to slowly increase as the day
  progressed.  By midday on 13 August satellite images indicated that a
  tropical depression appeared to be forming, and advisories on Tropical
  Depression 10 were initiated at 2100 UTC, placing the center about
  950 nm east of the Lesser Antilles.  Environmental conditions quickly
  became unfavorable, however, as an unusually deep upper-level trough
  developed to the west, and vertical shear had weakened the cyclone so
  much that advisories were discontinued the next day.  Over the next
  week or so the remnants of TD-10 continued westward, occasionally
  developing some convection but never really showing any signs of
  redevelopment.  By the afternoon of 20 August another westward-moving
  tropical wave seemed to have caught up with the remnants of TD-10, and
  cloudiness and showers extended from the Bahamas eastward for several
  hundred miles, the heaviest concentration being north of Puerto Rico.

     For the next couple of days the convective activity remained
  disorganized, but by the morning of 23 August convection was becoming
  more concentrated near the southeastern Bahamas.  A Special Tropical
  Disturbance Statement was issued by TPC/NHC at 23/1835 UTC, indicating
  that a tropical depression was forming within the area of disturbed
  weather.  There was a debate at NHC regarding whether to re-designate
  this depression as TD-10, or to give it a new number.  Since the old
  TD-10 LLCC had dissipated and another tropical wave had been a player,
  it was decided to number the new depression as TD-12.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     The tropical cyclone initially moved northwestward through the
  western Bahamas, passing east of Nassau and west of Eleuthera Island
  as it headed for a weakness in the Bermuda HIGH near the southeastern
  U. S. coast.  Gradual development ensued, and the depression was upgraded
  to Tropical Storm Katrina in a special update issued at 1205 UTC on
  24 August while located about 60 nm southeast of Nassau.   The upgrade
  was based on satellite imagery, Doppler radar data from the Bahamas, and
  an 1153 UTC reconnaissance 925-mb FLW of 48 kts in the northeast
  quadrant.   Katrina continued moving northwestward until it reached the
  26th parallel.  At that point it turned abruptly westward as the weakness
  in the HIGH was replaced by a developing ridge.   The cyclone continued
  to steadily intensify, becoming much better developed by the morning of
  25 August.  Katrina was upgraded to a hurricane in a special update
  issued at 25/1935 UTC, based on NOAA reconnaissance Stepped-Frequency
  Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) reports of surface winds of 64 kts as well
  as NOAA-Miami Doppler radar velocities of 90 kts at 915 metres.  The
  storm at this time was centered only about 30 nm east-northeast of
  Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and moving westward at 5 kts.

     The eye of Hurricane Katrina made landfall around 25/2300 UTC between
  Hallandale Beach and North Miami Beach with the MSW estimated at 70 kts.
  Shortly before reaching the coast, the cyclone turned to a west-
  southwesterly heading which it followed across the extreme southern
  portion of the peninsula, emerging into the Gulf of Mexico around 0700
  UTC on 26 August at a point approximately 40 nm south-southeast of Marco
  Island.  Katrina had weakened to 60 kts crossing the southern tip of
  Florida, but it quickly regained hurricane intensity--by 0900 UTC the
  cyclone had been re-upgraded to hurricane status, and by early afternoon
  Katrina was a Category 2 hurricane sporting 85-kt winds.  The unusual
  west-southwesterly motion continued through about 0600 UTC on the 27th,
  at which time Katrina was located about 115 nm west of Key West, or about
  390 nm southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River.  The motion
  toward the southwest was apparently due to a very strong deep-layer mean
  HIGH centered over Texas, but this feature was forecast to move westward
  and leave a weakness over the central Gulf of Mexico.

     Katrina was upgraded to a Category 3 hurricane with 100-kt winds at
  27/1500 UTC, based on Dvorak intensity estimates ranging from 102 to
  115 kts, plus a central pressure of 940 mb measured at 0932 UTC.  The
  peak FLW measured by the aircraft was 106 kts--somewhat lower than would
  normally be expected for a 940-mb hurricane.  Katrina's intensification
  was halted by an eyewall replacement cycle which began during the morning
  of the 27th.  The MSW remained pegged at 100 kts for 18 hours while the
  CP rose as high as 950 mb before beginning to slowly fall once more.
  Very early on 28 August a reconnaissance plane found peak 700-mb winds
  of 137 kts in the northwestern eyewall, along with a corresponding CP of
  935 mb.  Katrina was upgraded to a Category 4 hurricane with a MSW of
  125 kts in a special advisory issued at 28/0600 UTC.  Not only was
  Katrina intensifying, its wind field was expanding also.  Hurricane-force
  winds now covered an area over 100 nm in diameter while gales covered
  an area 240 nm across.    The hurricane at this time was located about
  270 nm south-southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, moving
  west-northwestward at 7 kts.

     The dangerous Katrina continued to intensify.  By 28/0921 UTC the CP
  had fallen to 915 mb, and to 910 mb by 1104 UTC.   A reconnaissance air-
  craft measured a 700-mb FLW of 153 kts, so another special advisory was
  issued at 1200 UTC upgrading Katrina to a 140-kt Category 5 hurricane on
  the Saffir/Simpson scale.   A CP of 907 mb was measured at 1417 UTC along
  with a peak FLW of 166 kts.  Katrina's MSW was upped to its peak value of
  150 kts in the regular 1500 UTC advisory.  The minimum CP of 902 mb was
  first measured at 1755 UTC and remained there for at least the next two
  hours.   This 902-mb pressure ranked Katrina as the fourth most intense
  Atlantic hurricane on record, based on central pressure, after Gilbert,
  1988 (888 mb), the Labor Day storm of 1935 (892 mb), and Allen, 1980
  (899 mb).  However, this was to be pushed back to 5th place in less
  than a month as Hurricane Rita's CP dipped to 897 mb, and further to
  6th place in late October as Hurricane Wilma bottomed out at 882 mb.

     Even though Katrina's pressure continued to fall a few millibars after
  the MSW had reached 150 kts, the intensity was scaled back slightly to
  145 kts in the 28/2100 UTC advisory.  The explanation given was that
  data from the SFMR instrument on board the aircraft suggested that the
  700-mb flight level to surface wind reduction ratio might not be quite
  as large as the 90% value typically used for eyewall winds.  However,
  the TPC/NHC monthly summary for August lists the peak MSW for Katrina
  as 150 kts, so it will be interesting to see what Katrina's peak MSW
  is after post-storm analysis.   The next discussion (at 29/0300 UTC)
  raises some questions about the performance of the SFMR at such high
  wind speeds, so perhaps 150 kts will stand as Katrina's peak MSW.  At
  2100 UTC on the 28th, the center of this large, extremely dangerous
  hurricane was located approximately 130 nm south of the Mississippi
  River's mouth, moving toward the northwest at 11 kts.

     By 29/0000 UTC Katrina's motion had become more north-northwestward,
  and by 0700 UTC the storm was headed due north at 10 kts toward the
  Louisiana coast.   After peaking in intensity on the afternoon of the
  28th, Katrina began to slowly weaken, due in part to eyewall dynamics
  and also due to some dry air entrainment on the western side.  The
  center of Katrina made landfall in Plaquemines Parish around 1200 UTC
  on 29 August with a CP of 921 mb and MSW of 120 kts.   Hurricane-force
  winds covered an area 170 nm in diameter and gales extended across an
  area almost 400 nm in diameter.  Continuing northward, Katrina made a
  second landfall near the Louisiana/Mississippi border around 1500 UTC
  with the MSW estimated at 110 kts.  As the storm continued northward
  through Mississippi, it began to weaken rather rapidly.  Winds were
  down to 85 kts by 1800 UTC, and Katrina was downgraded to a 55-kt
  tropical storm at 30/0000 UTC when located about 50 km (30 miles)
  northwest of Meridian, Mississippi.  The former Category 5 hurricane
  continued to weaken as it moved north-northeastward, becoming a
  tropical depression near Clarksville, Tennessee, at 30/1500 UTC.  By
  the afternoon of 31 August the remnants of Katrina were racing east-
  northeastward near Binghamton, New York.

     A graphic displaying the track of Hurricane Katrina may be found at
  the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/ATLANTIC_NORTH/2005_12L_KATRINA.jpg>

     Another graphic depicting a zoom-in of the track across Florida to
  the northern Gulf Coast landfall may be found at:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/ATLANTIC_NORTH/2005_12L_KATRINA_ZOOM.jpg>


  C. Meteorological Observations
  ------------------------------

  (1) Wind Observations
  ---------------------

     During Katrina's traversal of South Florida, the highest wind gusts
  located by the author was a gust to 76 kts at NHC and a gust of 70 kts
  at Tamiami Airport.

     As Katrina neared its landfall in Louisiana, Grand Isle reported
  sustained winds to 76 kts, gusting to 99 kts, in the hour ending at
  29/1000 UTC.  During the same hour a Florida Coastal Monitoring Program
  wind tower in Galliano, Louisiana, reported sustained winds of 69 kts
  with gusts to 87 kts.   Between 1000 and 1100 UTC the New Orleans Lake-
  front Airport reported a sustained wind of 49 kts with a gust to 74 kts.
  The Naval Air Station in Belle Chasse, Louisiana, reported sustained
  winds of hurricane force with a peak gust of 83 kts.  During the
  following hour this station reported a gust of 91 kts.

     Between 1300 and 1400 UTC the Pascagoula, Mississippi Civil Defense
  Office reported a gust of 103 kts, and the Gulfport Emergency Operations
  Center reported sustained winds of 82 kts with a peak gust of 87 kts.
  Farther from the center, Dauphin Island, Alabama, reported peak sustained
  winds of 66 kts with a gust to 89 kts.  Mobile reported a peak gust of
  72 kts, and Pensacola, Florida, reported sustained winds of 45 kts with
  a gust to 60 kts.

     There was a report circulating that a gust of 117 kts had been
  recorded at Slidell, Louisiana, but Scott Spratt of the Melbourne NWS
  office, who was detailed to the NWS office in Slidell for Katrina's
  landfall, states that the 117-kt report was erroneous.  Scott did
  indicate that a peak gust of 99 kts was recorded at mid-lake on the
  Pontchartrain Causeway, but the elevation was unknown.

  (2) Rainfall Observations
  -------------------------

     There was initially a report of 840 mm in 20 hours at a location in
  the Everglades in southern Florida, but according to David Roth of HPC,
  this was later discounted as it was out of tolerance with other reliable
  reports in the area.  The peak storm-related rainfall available to the
  author from southern Florida was 415 mm near Perrine, located between
  Miami and Homestead.

     HPC's Katrina rainfall report can be accessed at the following link:

     http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/tropical/rain/katrina2005rain.gif>

     In the Bahamas, Katrina caused a 24-hour rainfall of 100.9 mm at the
  Nassau Airport (WMO 78073, 25.1N/77.5W) between 25/1200 and 26/1200 UTC.

     In Cuba, Bahia Honda in Pinar del Rio Province (WMO 78318, 22.9N/
  83.2W) reported a peak 24-hourly total of 147.3 mm between 27/0000 and
  28/0000 UTC.  Some locations in the province experienced between 200
  and 300 mm of storm total rainfall as Katrina passed westward to the
  north of Cuba.

     The remnants of Katrina were responsible for some significant rains
  in the Canadian Province of Quebec.  Charlevoix (WMO 71319, 47.3N/70.6W)
  reported a peak 24-hourly total of 177.8 mm between 31/0600 and 01/0600
  UTC on 1 September.   Several other locations logged over 100 mm of rain
  associated with Katrina.

  (3) Surge Observations
  ----------------------

     Bill McCaul relates in an e-mail that well-known storm chaser Tim
  Marshall made a preliminary ground-level survey of the devastated areas
  along the Mississippi coast.  Mr. Marshall estimated that the surge
  reached 5.5 m (18 ft) in Pascagoula, 6.1 m (20 ft) in Ocean Springs,
  6.4 m (21 ft) in Biloxi, 7.0 m (23 ft) in Gulfport, 7.9 m (26 ft) in
  Long Beach-Pass Christian (essentially equal here to Hurricane Camille's
  surge), 8.5 m (28 ft) in Bay St. Louis, and 9.8 m (32 ft) in Waveland.
  The NWS Slidell also performed some surveying in Hancock County, MS,
  and estimate that the maximum storm surge may have reached 10.7 m (35 ft)
  in Waveland.  This is based on the fact that the Hancock County Emergency
  Operations Center is at an elevation of 30 ft, and personnel reported
  wading through chest-deep water while evacuating.

     Pat Fitzpatrick reported that the surge in Slidell, LA, along the
  northeastern shore of Lake Pontchartrain was between 6.1 and 7.6 m
  (20-25 ft).  In one instance a two-story apartment with a base about
  8 ft in elevation showed a waterline near the roof.  Mr. Fitzpatrick
  also noted that the twin-span Interstate 10 bridge across the lake
  resembled a jig-saw puzzle.

  (4) Miscellaneous
  -----------------

     Rich Henning, a member of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron
  (the Hurricane Hunters) reports that the crew on a NOAA reconnaissance
  mission measured an eye temperature of 29 C, which may be a record warm
  eye measurement for the Atlantic basin.  A few Western Pacific super
  typhoons have been found to have eye temperatures of 30 and 31 deg C.


  D. Storm Effects
  ----------------

     Everyone around the globe who has access to the international cable
  TV news channels saw many, many pictures of the indescribable destruction
  wrought by Katrina.   The damage and casualty figures quoted in the
  introductory paragraph are preliminary--it will likely be months before
  an accurate death toll is known, and the overall economic effects of
  Katrina, including direct damage, recovery costs, upped gas prices,
  increased insurance rates, loss of tourism dollars, etc may never be
  accurately known.

     In the 1960s, the two great north-central Gulf Coast hurricanes of
  of that decade, Betsy and Camille, were the first two U. S. hurricanes
  to cause direct damages in excess of $1 billion, in terms of current
  dollar values.  These two storms have become legendary in the annals
  of Gulf Coast hurricane history.   Betsy struck southeastern Louisiana,
  the eye passing very near Grand Isle and later just south and west
  of New Orleans.  Camille's eye moved northward just east of the
  Mississippi River delta and made landfall along the western Mississippi
  coastline, the eye passing over Clermont Harbor, Waveland and Bay St.
  Louis.  Katrina combined the worst effects of both those famous storms
  and far exceeded them.  Betsy reportedly flooded 20% of New Orleans;
  Katrina left 80% of the Crescent City under water.   Camille obliterated
  much of southern Mississippi with a storm surge ranging from 11.2 feet
  at Pascagoula to 24.2 feet at Pass Christian; Katrina obliterated even
  more with a surge ranging from an estimated 18 feet at Pascagoula to
  35 feet at Waveland.

     With all the focus on the catastrophe in Louisiana and Mississippi,
  it is easy to overlook the fact that Katrina hit southern Florida with
  a pretty good punch.  There are 11 confirmed deaths from the storm
  during its passage across the southern Florida Peninsula with about
  half of these involving falling trees.   There have been reports in
  the media about many Floridians in Katrina's path not taking the
  storm perhaps as seriously as they should nor seeking appropriate
  shelter.  A lesson to be learned from Katrina in south Florida is that
  even a Category 1 hurricane is capable of easily bringing down trees
  and persons should not be out in the open or driving in their cars
  unless it is absolutely necessary.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                           TROPICAL STORM LEE
                                 (TC-13)
                        28 August - 2 September
              -------------------------------------------

     Tropical Storm Lee was a one-hit wonder, being reported at tropical
  storm intensity for only one warning cycle, i.e., a 6-hour period.  In
  contrast to the previous 8 tropical storms of the 2005 season, Lee was
  not the earliest tropical storm of its rank to form.  Cyclones Dennis
  through Katrina became the earliest 4th through 11th Atlantic storms on
  record, respectively, but Lee was not the earliest 12th tropical storm
  of the season.    That distinction is held by mighty Hurricane Luis of
  1995, which became a named storm on 29 August (Lee was named on
  31 August).

     A large tropical wave left the coast of Africa the last week of
  August, and by midday on the 26th was located some 600 nm southwest of
  the Cape Verde Islands, accompanied by a low-pressure area.  Convection
  had become better organized and the system was mentioned in the 1530 UTC
  Tropical Weather Outlook issued by TPC/NHC.  Convective organization
  gradually improved as the disturbance continued westward across the
  tropical Atlantic, and by the afternoon of the 28th had reached the point
  that advisories were initiated on Tropical Depression 13, located about
  840 nm east of the Lesser Antilles.  Only slow intensification was
  forecast, and even this failed to materialize.    The depression was
  located within an environment of moderate easterly shear, and by the
  next morning visible satellite images and a few surface observations
  indicated that it had degenerated into a broad area of low pressure.

     The remaining area of disturbed weather moved northward and by the
  morning of the 30th was located several hundred miles southeast of
  Bermuda.  The 30/1530 UTC Tropical Weather Outlook referred to it as
  "a complex area of disturbed weather, which includes the remnants of
  Tropical Depression Thirteen."  The system began to show some signs of
  redevelopment later in the day, and at 1500 UTC on 31 August was
  re-upgraded to tropical depression status about 775 nm east-southeast
  of Bermuda.  The upgrade was based on Dvorak classifications of T2.0
  from TAFB and SAB, and SSM/I image around 1000 UTC which showed a
  convective ring associated with the center.  Six hours later Dvorak
  T-numbers from the two agencies had reached T2.5, so based on these,
  and also AMSU estimates, the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm
  Lee.  However, no sooner had Lee been named than the cloud pattern
  began to deteriorate, so the minimal tropical storm was downgraded to
  depression status at 0300 UTC on 1 September.

     Following the downgrade, Tropical Depression Lee, which had been
  moving northeastward, turned back to the northwest.  The system
  continued to weaken, taking on a more subtropical appearance, and the
  final advisory was issued at 0300 UTC on 2 September.  According to
  David Roth, the remnants of Lee were absorbed into another system which
  had originated in the deep tropics and subsequently moved northward.
  That particular tropical wave had been very impressive when it had moved
  off the coast of Africa on 20 August--indeed it had been very well-
  organized even while crossing the African continent, and it was thought
  it might have a good chance of becoming the season's first intense Cape
  Verde hurricane.  However, the wave moved into an environment of fairly
  strong vertical shear as it crossed the eastern Atlantic.  QuikScat data
  revealed the existence of 35+ kt winds on the northern side, but the
  system remained highly sheared while in the deep tropics with the deep
  convection being well-removed from the weak LLCC.     David's e-mail 
  suggests that it's open to question as to whether the development which
  produced the ephemeral Lee was really a revival of TD-13 or due more to
  the earlier system.

     A graphic displaying the track of Tropical Storm Lee may be found at
  the following link:

   http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2005/atlantic/BT-IMAGES/2005_13L_LEE.jpg>

     No casualties or damage are known to have resulted from Tropical
  Storm Lee.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST PACIFIC (NEP) - North Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 180

  Activity for August:  1 tropical depression
                        2 tropical storms
                        2 hurricanes


                        Sources of Information
                        ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below was obtained from the
  various tropical cyclone products issued by the Tropical Prediction
  Center/National Hurricane Center (TPC/NHC) in Miami, Florida (or the
  Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) in Honolulu, Hawaii, for
  locations west of longitude 140W):  discussions, public advisories,
  forecast/advisories, tropical weather outlooks, special tropical
  disturbance statements, etc.  Some additional information may have
  been gleaned from the monthly summaries prepared by the hurricane
  specialists and available on TPC/NHC's website.  All references to
  sustained winds imply a 1-minute averaging period unless otherwise
  noted.


               Northeast Pacific Tropical Activity for August
               ----------------------------------------------

     Five tropical cyclones formed in the Northeast Pacific basin during
  the month of August with four becoming named tropical storms or
  hurricanes.   Averages for August over the period 1971-2004 are:  4.0
  named storms, 2.4 hurricanes, 1.1 intense hurricanes and a NTC of 25%.
  Two of the August, 2005, storms became hurricanes but neither became
  an intense hurricane.  These storms resulted in a somewhat below average
  NTC of 16%.  None of the storms made landfall in Mexico, and only one
  produced any effects along the coastline.  Reports follow on Hurricanes
  Fernanda and Hilary and Tropical Storms Greg and Irwin.

     Additionally, another system was classified as a tropical depression
  by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu, Hawaii.  This weak
  depression (TD-01C), which never generated winds exceeding 25 kts, formed
  around 1800 UTC on 3 August when it was located approximately 885 nm
  east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.  It subsequently moved westward, then
  west-southwestward over the next day or so, losing its identity about
  630 nm east-southeast of Hilo by 0300 UTC on 5 August.

     Additional information, including satellite pictures and links, may
  be found at the following URL:

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_Pacific_hurricane_season>



                            HURRICANE FERNANDA
                                 (TC-06E)
                              9 - 16 August
                  --------------------------------------

     Hurricane Fernanda was the second hurricane of the 2005 Northeast
  Pacific tropical cyclone season and the first hurricane in the basin
  in almost three months.  A westward-moving area of disturbed weather
  was located about 650 nm south-southeast of the southern tip of Baja
  California on 7 August.  This disturbance gradually became better
  organized and advisories were initiated on Tropical Depression 06E
  at 1500 UTC on 9 August.  The depression was then centered roughly
  600 nm south-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, moving west at 12 kts.
  Intensification continued as the tropical cyclone turned to more of a
  west-northwesterly track on the 10th, and Tropical Storm Fernanda was
  christened at 10/0300 UTC based on 35-kt satellite intensity estimates
  from TAFB and SAB.   Fernanda steadily increased in intensity as it
  continued west-northwestward, and the storm became the season's second
  hurricane at 0900 UTC on 11 August while located about 700 nm southwest
  of Cabo San Lucas.

     Hurricane Fernanda reached its peak intensity at 1500 UTC on the 12th
  with the MSW estimated at 75 kts and a CP of 979 mb.  The cyclone at the
  time was located a little over 800 nm west-southwest of the tip of the
  Baja California Peninsula.  Peak intensity was maintained for 18 hours
  and then the MSW began to slowly decline as the environment became more
  hostile and the SSTs along its path cooled.   Fernanda was downgraded
  to a tropical storm at 14/0900 UTC, and around this time the cyclone's
  track became west-southwesterly.  The weakening trend continued and
  Fernanda was downgraded to a tropical depression at 15/2100 UTC.  The
  final TPC/NHC advisory at 16/0300 UTC placed a weak 25-kt remnant LOW
  approximately 1150 nm east-southeast of Hilo, Hawaii.

     No deaths or damages have been attributed to Hurricane Fernanda.

     A graphic depicting the track of Hurricane Fernanda may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_EAST/2005_06E_FERNANDA.jpg>

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                            TROPICAL STORM GREG
                                  (TC-07E)
                              11 - 15 August
                  ---------------------------------------

     A westward-moving area of disturbed weather located approximately
  425 nm south of Manzanillo, Mexico, was mentioned in the 10 August
  1700 UTC Eastern Pacific Tropical Weather Outlook issued by TPC/NHC.
  The disturbance was located in an environment of marginally-favorable
  upper-level winds so it was anticipated that any future development
  would be slow to occur.   However, early on the morning of 11 August
  the system began to quickly organize as deep convection increased
  markedly just over and south of the LLCC.  Advisories were initiated
  on Tropical Depression 07E with a special release at 11/1100 UTC, the
  center being located roughly 600 nm south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas,
  moving west-northwestward at 10 kts.  The initial MSW was set at 25 kts,
  but by 1500 UTC the satellite signature had improved to the point that
  TAFB was rating the system at T2.5, so it was upgraded to Tropical
  Storm Greg at that time.
  
     Tropical Storm Greg quickly reached its peak intensity of 45 kts at
  0300 UTC on 12 August while located about 575 nm south-southwest of
  Cabo San Lucas.  The storm weakened slightly thereafter, but then main-
  tained an intensity near or slightly above minimal tropical storm
  strength for several days.   Northerly shear was the primary inhibiting
  influence on Greg, preventing it from intensifying.     The cyclone
  initially moved toward the west, then turned northwestward on the 12th,
  then back to the west on the 13th.  After this a developing ridge between
  Greg and Hurricane Fernanda farther west forced the cyclone to drift to
  the south and southwest while northerly shear caused the system to weaken
  to depression status.  The final TPC/NHC advisory on Greg, issued at
  15/2100 UTC, placed the weakening center approximately 650 nm to the
  southwest of Cabo San Lucas.

     No deaths or damages have been attributed to Tropical Storm Greg.

     A graphic depicting the track of Tropical Storm Greg may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_EAST/2005_07E_GREG.jpg>

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                            HURRICANE HILARY
                                (TC-08E)
                             19 - 25 August
                  ------------------------------------

     Hurricane Hilary formed much farther to the east than most of the
  season's tropical cyclones.  On the morning of 17 August the Eastern
  Pacific Tropical Weather Outlook indicated that an area of disturbed
  weather about 250 nm south of El Salvador was gradually becoming better
  organized as it moved westward.  The disturbance was south of Guatemala
  the next day and its organization was still slowly increasing.  The
  first advisory on Tropical Depression 08E was issued by TPC/NHC at
  1500 UTC on 19 August placing the center approximately 375 nm southeast
  of Acapulco, Mexico, south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec.  The intensity
  was assessed at 25 kts and the depression was moving west-northwestward
  at 12 kts.   Although satellite intensity estimates from SAB and TAFB
  were 30 kts at 20/0000 UTC, by advisory time at 0300 UTC the cloud
  pattern had increased in organization with banding and cloud tops colder
  than -80 C south of the center, so at that point the depression was
  upgraded to Tropical Storm Hilary.

     For the next couple of days Hilary followed a west-northwesterly
  trajectory roughly parallel to the Mexican coastline about 225 nm
  offshore.  Hurricane intensity was reached at 21/0000 UTC with the center
  located approximately 300 nm south of Manzanillo.  An expanding wind
  field brought tropical storm-force winds to the coast near Manzanillo
  later that day, requiring the issuance of a tropical storm warning for
  portions of the Mexican coastline.  This was cancelled the next day
  as the storm began to pull away from the coastline.  Hurricane Hilary
  reached its peak intensity of 90 kts (with a CP of 970 mb) at 0600 UTC
  on 22 August while located approximately 300 nm due south of Cabo San
  Lucas.  Thereafter the winds began to slowly decline as the storm
  continued to move to the west-northwest, bringing it into increasingly
  cooler water.  Hilary was downgraded to a tropical storm at 24/2100 UTC
  and to a tropical depression 24 hours later.  The final advisory on
  Hilary was issued at 25/2100 UTC and placed the non-convective remnant
  LOW about 625 nm west-northwest of Cabo San Lucas.

     Although tropical storm-force winds and heavy rains were experienced
  along the Mexican coastline, no deaths or damage have been reported in
  association with Hurricane Hilary.

     A graphic depicting the track of Hurricane Hilary may be found at
  the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_EAST/2005_08E_HILARY.gif>

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                           TROPICAL STORM IRWIN
                                 (TC-09E)
                              25 - 28 August
                 ----------------------------------------

     A Tropical Weather Outlook issued by TPC/NHC on the afternoon of
  23 August indicated that an area of disturbed weather had formed within
  a couple hundred miles of the Pacific coast of Mexico between Manzanillo
  and Acapulco, moving westward at around 12 kts.  By the next afternoon
  the system had exhibited increased organization and conditions were
  favorable for a depression to form within the next day or two.  Showers
  and thunderstorms continued to increase on the morning of the 25th and
  advisories were initiated on Tropical Depression 09E at 2100 UTC that
  day.  The depression's center was located approximately 150 nm southwest
  of Manzanillo and moving slightly north of due west at 10 kts.  The
  MSW was estimated at 30 kts, based on Dvorak classifications of T2.0
  from SAB and T1.5 from TAFB, and the depression was forecast to soon
  increase to tropical storm intensity.

     Tropical Storm Irwin was christened at 0900 UTC on 26 August, and
  reached its peak intensity of 45 kts six hours later while located about
  325 nm south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas on the southern tip of the Baja
  California Peninsula.  The peak intensity was maintained for 18 hours as
  Irwin sailed westward, and then a slow decline set in.   Irwin had
  weakened to a tropical depression by 0300 UTC on 28 August, and had
  become a swirl of low-level clouds devoid of deep convection by 1500 UTC
  that day.  The final TPC/NHC advisory at 1500 UTC placed the LOW center
  approximately 475 nm southwest of Cabo San Lucas.

     No deaths of damages have been attributed to Tropical Storm Irwin.

     A graphic depicting the track of Tropical Storm Irwin may be found at
  the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_EAST/2005_09E_IRWIN.gif>

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST PACIFIC (NWP) - North Pacific Ocean West of Longitude 180

  Activity for August:  3 tropical depressions **
                        1 tropical storm
                        3 typhoons
                        2 super typhoons

  ** - treated as tropical depressions by various Asian warning centers
       but not by JTWC


                         Sources of Information
                         ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below is based upon tropical
  cyclone warnings and significant tropical weather outlooks issued
  by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center of the U. S. Air Force and
  Navy (JTWC), located at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.   In the companion
  tropical cyclone tracks file, I normally annotate track coordinates
  from some of the various Asian warning centers when their center
  positions differ from JTWC's by usually 40-50 nm or more.   All
  references to sustained winds imply a 1-minute averaging period
  unless otherwise noted.

     Michael V. Padua of Naga City in the Philippines, owner of the
  Typhoon 2000 website, normally sends me cyclone tracks based upon
  warnings issued by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the
  Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical & Astronomical Services
  Administration (PAGASA).  Also, Huang Chunliang of Fuzhou City, China,
  sends data taken from synoptic observations around the Northwest
  Pacific basin.  A very special thanks to Michael and Chunliang for
  the assistance they so reliably provide.

     In the title line for each storm I have referenced all the cyclone
  names/numbers I have available:   JTWC's depression number, the 
  JMA-assigned name (if any), JMA's tropical storm numeric designator,
  and PAGASA's name for systems forming in or passing through their
  area of warning responsibility.


               Northwest Pacific Tropical Activity for August
               ----------------------------------------------

     The Northwest Pacific basin was very active during the month of
  August.  Six tropical cyclones became named tropical storms with five
  reaching typhoon intensity, and of these, two were declared super
  typhoons per JTWC's analysis.  In addition to the six named storms,
  three systems were treated as tropical depressions by JMA and some of
  the other Asian TCWCs, but not by JTWC.   Of these three tropical
  depressions, the first was a weak system mentioned only by JMA in their
  High Seas Bulletins, and only on 3 August.   On that day the depression
  was located well in the subtropics, near 30N/151E, and appeared to be
  quasi-stationary.  No winds were given, and likely the MSW did not
  exceed 20 or 25 kts.  This depression was not referenced at all in the
  STWOs issued by JTWC, and given the latitude, was likely hybrid in
  nature.   The other two non-developing tropical depressions were both
  spawned in the South China Sea, and while following different tracks,
  both ultimately entered the Gulf of Tonkin and made landfall in Vietnam.
  Short reports sent by Huang Chunliang containing rainfall observations
  for these systems follow.

     Except for Tropical Storm Guchol, which recurved well south and east
  of Japan, all the remaining named cyclones made landfall in various
  Western Pacific rim nations, some with disastrous results.  Japan was
  struck by Typhoons Mawar and Nabi, the latter also passing through the
  Mariana Islands at typhoon strength.  Typhoons Matsa, Sanvu and Talim all
  ultimately made landfall on the Chinese mainland with Sanvu and Talim
  also striking Luzon and Taiwan, respectively.  Reports on all the named
  tropical cyclones follow, authored by Kevin Boyle with additional data
  sent by Huang Chunliang.

  NOTE: I have not yet received Huang Chunliang's reports of meteorological
  observations and storm effects in China from Tropical Storm Sanvu and
  Typhoon Talim.   When these become available I will include them as
  addenda to a future summary.



                           Tropical Depression
                        (NMCC02 / NRL Invest 94W)
                              9 - 12 August
              ---------------------------------------------

     This tropical depression, designated as TD02 by NMCC, formed in
  the north-central South China Sea and moved generally westward,
  crossing the central portion of Hainan Dao, thence entering the Gulf
  of Tonkin and making landfall in north-central Vietnam.  Following are
  reports of rainfall observations from China, Vietnam and Thailand, all
  compiled and sent to the author by Huang Chunliang.

  A. Report from China
  --------------------

  {Part I} Landfalls
  ==================

     According to the NMCC warnings, Tropical Depression 02 made landfall
  near Qinglan Town, Wenchang City, Hainan Province, around 10/0840 UTC
  with a MSW of 13 m/s (25 kts) and a CP of 994 hPa.

     According to the GRMC warnings, the TD made one more landfall over
  northeastern Viet Nam around 11/2000 UTC with a MSW of 12 m/s (25 kts)
  and a CP of 995 hPa.


  {Part II} Rainfall Obs from Hainan Province
  ===========================================

  1. South China Sea Islands
  --------------------------

  SANHU DAO (WMO59985, 16.53N/111.62E)    220.4 mm  [09/00-10/00Z]
  SANHU DAO (WMO59985, 16.53N/111.62E)    122.7 mm  [10/00-11/00Z]
  XISHA DAO (WMO59981, 16.83N/112.33E)    169.3 mm  [10/00-11/00Z]

  2. Hainan Island
  ----------------

     During the 48-hr period ending at 11/0000 UTC, rains >100 mm were
  recorded in 4 counties/cities.


  {Part III} References (All in Chinese version)
  ==============================================

     http://www.nmc.gov.cn>       
     http://www.grmc.gov.cn>      


  B. Report from Vietnam
  ----------------------

     Only 24-hr rainfall amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  THANH HOA (19.75N/105.78E)             129.6 mm   [10/12-11/12Z]


  C. Report from Thailand
  -----------------------

     Only 24-hr rainfall amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  PHAYAO (WMO48310, 19.13N/99.90E)              133.5 mm  [11/18-12/18Z]
  PHAYAO (WMO48310, 19.13N/99.90E)              154.3 mm  [12/00-13/00Z]
  PHAYAO (WMO48310, 19.13N/99.90E)              149.2 mm  [12/06-13/06Z]
  PHAYAO (WMO48310, 19.13N/99.90E)              120.4 mm  [12/12-13/12Z]
  THA WANG PHA (WMO48315, 19.12N/100.80E)       107.9 mm  [11/18-12/18Z]
  THA WANG PHA (WMO48315, 19.12N/100.80E)       118.0 mm  [12/00-13/00Z]
  THA WANG PHA (WMO48315, 19.12N/100.80E)       105.8 mm  [12/06-13/06Z]

  (Report compiled by Huang Chunliang)



                           Tropical Depression
                             (NRL Invest 98W)
                              27 - 30 August
                 ---------------------------------------

     This late August depression formed in the central South China Sea
  and moved northwestward, reaching the Gulf of Tonkin where it turned
  to the west and moved into north-central Vietnam.  Following are
  reports of rainfall observations from Vietnam and Thailand compiled
  and sent to the author by Huang Chunliang.

  A. Report from Vietnam
  ----------------------

     Only 24-hr rainfall amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  DA NANG (16.07N/108.35E)              166.6 mm   [28/12-29/12Z]
  HUE (16.43N/107.58E)                  127.8 mm   [28/12-29/12Z]
  THANH HOA (19.75N/105.78E)            175.7 mm   [30/12-31/12Z]


  B. Report from Thailand
  -----------------------

     Only 24-hr rainfall amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  NAKHON PHANOM (WMO48357, 17.42N/104.78E)       158.4 mm  [30/06-31/06Z]
  NAKHON PHANOM (WMO48357, 17.42N/104.78E)       164.8 mm  [30/12-31/12Z]
  NAKHON PHANOM (WMO48357, 17.42N/104.78E)       158.3 mm  [30/18-31/18Z]
  NAKHON PHANOM (WMO48357, 17.42N/104.78E)       109.8 mm  [31/00-01/00Z]
  NAKHON RATCHASIMA (WMO48431, 14.97N/102.08E)   114.6 mm  [31/12-01/12Z]
  NAKHON RATCHASIMA (WMO48431, 14.97N/102.08E)   114.6 mm  [31/18-01/18Z]

  (Report compiled by Huang Chunliang)



                             TYPHOON MATSA
                       (TC-09W / TY 0509 / GORIO)
                          30 July - 8 August
             ----------------------------------------------

  Matsa: contributed by Laos, means 'lady fish'

  A. Storm Origins
  ----------------

     On 30 July an area of convection developed approximately 100 nm east 
  of Yap.    It was included in JTWC's STWO at 0300 UTC 30 July when 
  animated multi-spectral satellite imagery revealed consolidating deep 
  convection over a weak LLCC.  An upper-level analysis indicated that 
  the disturbance was embedded in a moderate wind shear environment with 
  favourable diffluence aloft.  Based on improved organization, JTWC 
  issued a TCFA at 30/1430 UTC followed by the first warning at 31/0000
  UTC.  TD-09W was quickly upgraded to a 35-kt tropical storm by JTWC at
  31/0600 UTC, and named Matsa after JMA raised their 10-min avg MSW to
  35 kts at 31/1200 UTC.  Also, at 31/1200 UTC PAGASA assigned the name
  Gorio after the system had drifted into their AOR.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     Initially moving west to west-northwestward, Tropical Storm Matsa 
  changed onto a northwesterly heading on 31 July under the steering 
  influence of a mid-level ridge to the east.  Continuing northwestwards, 
  Matsa slowly strengthened and reached typhoon intensity at 0000 UTC on 
  2 August when it was located approximately 565 nm south of Okinawa.  
  Intensification continued to be rather slow on 2 August and satellite 
  imagery depictions were of limited deep convection in the northern 
  semicircle and inhibited poleward outflow.  There was little change on 
  3 August and the MSW hovered at 75 kts for the majority of the day. 
 
     However, on 4 August, things improved and Typhoon Matsa became 
  better organized, reaching its peak intensity of 90 kts and 950 hPa at 
  04/1200 UTC when it was passing approximately 200 nm west-southwest of 
  Okinawa, Japan.  On 5 August Typhoon Matsa began to weaken as it headed 
  northwestwards, lashing northern parts of Taiwan with torrential rains 
  and gale-force winds as the storm passed by to the north.  Continuing 
  northwestward, Matsa made landfall near Wenling, China, as a minimal 
  typhoon around 05/1800 UTC, the second tropical cyclone to affect the 
  Chinese mainland in nearly two weeks.  Once inland, Matsa was 
  downgraded to a tropical storm at 06/0000 UTC, and JTWC issued the 
  final warning at this time.  JMA kept Matsa at tropical storm intensity
  as the cyclone turned northward over eastern China until 07/1200 UTC, 
  when that agency released the last statement on this system. 
 
     NMCC estimated a peak intensity of 90-kts while all other Asian 
  agencies estimated peak MSW of 80 kts.

     A graphic displaying the track of Typhoon Matsa/Gorio may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_09W_MATSA.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Ten deaths were reported by the Chinese media.  More than 1.24 million
  people were evacuated ahead of the storm.  Matsa caused extensive damage
  to property and agriculture in mainland China with monetary figures
  estimated at 14.5 million yuan (1.7 billion US dollars).  Matsa also
  affected Taiwan.  Rainfall totals of nearly 50 inches (1270 mm) fell in
  30 hours over the northern part of the island, causing landslides and
  widespread flooding.    Damages to agriculture were estimated at
  T$47 million (1.5 million US dollars).   No deaths were reported in
  Taiwan.

     A more detailed description (in pdf format) may be found at the 
  following links:

     http://www.guycarp.com/portal/extranet/pdf/CAT-i/GC_TC_MATSA_2005.pdf>

     http://www.guycarp.com/portal/extranet/pdf/CAT-i/GC_TC_MATSA_2005_2.pdf>

  (EDITOR'S NOTE:  Additional and updated information regarding damage and
  casualties can be found in Huang Chunliang's China report below in
  Section D, Part VI.)


  D. Huang Chunliang Report from China
  ------------------------------------

  {Part I} Landfalls
  ==================

     According to the NMCC warnings, Typhoon 0509 (MATSA) made its first
  landfall near Ganjiang Town, Yuhuan County, Taizhou City, Zhejiang
  Province, around 05/1940 UTC (August) with a MSW of 45 m/s (90 kts) and
  a CP of 950 hPa.  Crossing the Gulf of Yueqing, the typhoon made a second
  landfall near Qingjiang Town, Yueqing City (a sub-city of Wenzhou City),
  Zhejiang Province, around 05/2020 UTC with the MSW and CP unchanged.  The
  weakening tropical cyclone then passed through Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangsu
  and Shandong Provinces successively before the center of Tropical Storm
  Matsa entered the waters of the Bohai Sea from Shandong Peninsula around
  08/0600 UTC.  After fading into a tropical depression, Matsa made its
  final landfall near Longwangtang Town (38.8 N, 121.4 E), Lvshunkou
  District, Dalian City, Liaoning Province, around 08/2310 UTC with a MSW
  of 12 m/s (25 kts) and a CP of 995 hPa.  Eventually, NMCC declared Matsa
  extratropical shortly after the final landfall.


  {Part II} Daily Top-10 Rainfall Obs from Taiwan Province
  ========================================================

  [03/1600-04/1600Z]
  ------------------

  Ranking    Station ID         City/County         Rainfall
  ------------------------------------------------------------
  01         CWB 21D16          Hsinchu County      569.0 mm
  02         CWB 21D15          Hsinchu County      565.0 mm
  03         CWB C1E47          Miaoli County       549.0 mm
  04         CWB C1D40          Hsinchu County      530.0 mm
  05         CWB C0E41          Miaoli County       526.0 mm
  06         CWB C1E48          Miaoli County       467.5 mm
  07         CWB C1D41          Hsinchu County      461.0 mm
  08         CWB C1E46          Miaoli County       445.5 mm
  09         CWB 21C08          Taoyuan County      430.0 mm
  10         CWB C1E72          Miaoli County       427.0 mm


  [04/1600-05/1600Z]
  ------------------

  Ranking    Station ID         City/County         Rainfall
  ------------------------------------------------------------
  01         CWB C1F89          Taitung County      843.0 mm
  02         CWB C1F94          Taitung County      708.0 mm
  03         CWB 21D15          Hsinchu County      688.0 mm
  04         CWB 21D16          Hsinchu County      667.0 mm
  05         CWB C1F87          Taitung County      595.0 mm
  06         CWB 01A43          Taipei County       588.0 mm
  07         CWB C1E46          Miaoli County       578.0 mm
  08         CWB C1E72          Miaoli County       559.5 mm
  09         CWB 21C08          Taoyuan County      558.0 mm
  10         CWB C1F9H          Taitung County      557.0 mm


  [05/1600-06/1600Z]
  ------------------

  Ranking    Station ID         City/County         Rainfall
  ------------------------------------------------------------
  01         CWB C1V27          Kaohsiung County    416.5 mm
  02         CWB C1V30          Kaohsiung County    296.0 mm
  03         CWB C1V22          Kaohsiung County    294.0 mm
  04         CWB C1R16          Pingtung County     260.0 mm
  05         CWB C1V16          Kaohsiung County    250.5 mm
  06         CWB C1F87          Taitung County      250.0 mm
  07         CWB C1V20          Kaohsiung County    248.0 mm
  08         CWB C1V19          Kaohsiung County    246.5 mm
  09         CWB C1V21          Kaohsiung County    238.5 mm
  10         CWB C1F94          Taitung County      190.0 mm


  {Part III} Meteorological Obs from Zhejiang Province
  ====================================================

  1. Gust Obs
  -----------

     Forty-six stations recorded gusts of Beaufort Force 12 or higher
  during the typhoon.  Station Dongting, located in Putuo District,
  Zhoushan City, reported the highest gust of the province, peaking
  at 49.2 m/s.

  2. Rainfall Obs
  ---------------

     During the 96-hr period ending at 08/0000 UTC, rains >500 mm were
  reported by 12 stations (including hydrological stations) with Zhongbao,
  Yongjia County, Wenzhou City, reporting the highest amount of 701.4 mm.

     Extrema from Zhejiang Province during the typhoon included:

  1-hr rainfall:  91.5 mm @ Cengang Reservoir, Dinghai District, Zhoushan
  City [06/1400-08/1500Z]

  3-hr rainfall: 199.5 mm @ Cengang Reservoir, Dinghai District, Zhoushan
  City [06/1300-08/1600Z]

  6-hr rainfall: 300.5 mm @ Huachengsi Reservoir, Dinghai District,
  Zhoushan City [06/0700-08/1300Z]

  12-hr rainfall: 420.0 mm @ Huachengsi Reservoir, Dinghai District,
  Zhoushan City [06/0700-08/1900Z]

  24-hr rainfall: 606.9 mm @ Chaiqiao, Beilun District, Ningbo City,
  [05/1900-06/1900Z]

  Daily rainfall: 589.0 mm @ Chaiqiao, Beilun District, Ningbo City, 
  [06/0000-07/0000Z]

  3-day rainfall: 690.8 mm @ Zhongbao, Yongjia County, Wenzhou City, 
  [04/0000-07/0000Z]


  {Part IV} Meteorological Obs from Shanghai Municipality
  =======================================================

  1. Wind Obs
  -----------

     Sustained winds recorded by Station Gaoqiao, which is located near
  the mouth of Yangtse River, rose to gale force around 05/1800 UTC and
  did not drop below Beaufort Force 8 until 25 hrs later.  Peak gust
  reported by the station was 26.6 m/s.

     Station Xiaoyangshan reported gusts topping 40.7 m/s--the highest
  value ever reported by Shanghai--at 05/1351 UTC.

  2. Rainfall Obs
  ---------------

     During the 60-hr period ending at 08/0000 UTC, rains >300 mm were
  reported by 3 stations (including hydrological stations) with Zhoupu,
  Nanhui District, reporting the highest amount of 349.5 mm.  The station
  also reported the highest daily value, amounting to 292.0 mm [06/0000-
  07/0000Z].

  3. Hydrological Obs
  -------------------

     Several hydrological stations reported record-breaking water levels
  during the typhoon:

  Station                 Peak Water Level      Former Record
  ------------------------------------------------------------
  Mishidu                 4.38 m [06/1932Z]     4.27 m
  Songpu Bridge           4.46 m [06/1927Z]     4.42 m
  Mao Harbor              4.28 m [06/1945Z]     4.20 m
  Zhujing                 4.10 m [06/2000Z]     4.08 m
  Suzhou River Floodgate  4.55 m [06/1935Z]     4.45 m
  Hongkou Harbor          4.36 m [06/1810Z]     4.33 m
  Yangshupu Harbor        4.25 m [06/1630Z]     4.20 m
  Yangshupu Harbor        4.25 m [06/1630Z]     4.20 m
  Beixinjing              4.31 m [06/2005Z]     4.10 m


  {Part V} Meteorological Obs from Other Provinces
  ================================================

  1. Anhui Province
  -----------------

     During the 72-hr period ending at 08/0000 UTC, rains >100 mm were
  reported by 16 towns.  Guangde County reported the highest gust of the
  province, reaching 26 m/s on the 6th (LST).

  2. Jiangsu Province
  -------------------

     During the 72-hr period ending at 07/2100 UTC, rains >100 mm were
  reported by 27 counties/cities with Taicang City (a sub-city of Suzhou
  City) reporting the highest amount of 193.8 mm.  (Zhitang, Changshu City
  (a sub-city of Suzhou City) reported 218.4 mm--the highest of the hydro-
  logical stations during the same period.)  Station Yuantuojiao, located
  in Qidong City (a sub-city of Nantong City), reported a peak gust of
  34 m/s--the highest value of the province during the storm.

  3. Shandong Province
  --------------------

     During the 24-hr period ending at 08/0100 UTC, rains >100 mm were
  reported by 9 counties/cities with Rongcheng City (a sub-city of Weihai
  City) reporting the highest amount of 150.5 mm.

     Lingshan Dao and Dagong Dao, both located in Qingdao City, reported
  gusts of typhoon force, peaking at 36.7 m/s and 34.9 m/s, respectively.

  4. Liaoning Province
  --------------------

     During the 31-hr period ending at 09/0000 UTC, Beiguan Reservoir,
  Dalian City reported the highest rainfall amount of 175 mm.


  {Part VI} Damage and Casualties
  ===============================

  1. Mainland China
  -----------------

     Typhoon Matsa affected 31,459,000 people in the 8 provinces/
  municipalities of Zhejiang, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Anhui, Shandong, Liaoning,
  Hebei and Fujian, resulting in the deaths of 25 people and the direct
  economic losses of over 18 billion yuan.  (Refer to statistics below.)
  Thousands of flights in Shanghai, Hangzhou, Ningbo and Wenzhou were
  delayed or cancelled under stormy condition.  Subway traffic in Shanghai
  was paralysed for about five hours due to the flood.

    Province                   Population  
  /Municipality   Evacuated     Affected       Deaths  
  -----------------------------------------------------
  Zhejiang        1,429,000     10,479,000      5 
  Shanghai          216,000      1,331,000      7 
  Jiangsu           200,000     12,200,000      8 
  Anhui              24,000      2,014,000      2 
  Shandong           58,000      3,800,000      - 
  Liaoning          153,000        865,000      3 
  Hebei             109,000        770,000      - 
  Fujian            116,000        -------      -

  [TOTAL]        [2,305,000]   [31,459,000]   [25]  


  Province                    Farmland        Houses      Direct economic
  /Municipality             Damaged (ha.)    Toppled         loss (yuan)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Zhejiang                     338,000        13,000        8,910,000,000
  Shanghai                      56,000        15,000        1,330,000,000
  Jiangsu                    1,110,000        14,000        3,400,000,000
  Anhui                        113,000         3,000          660,000,000
  Shandong                     354,000         3,500        2,940,000,000
  Liaoning                     143,000        10,000          600,000,000
  Hebei                         24,000           300          170,000,000

  [TOTAL]                   [2,138,000]      [59,000]     [18,010,000,000]

  2. Taiwan
  ---------

     Preliminary statistics indicated that Typhoon Matsa left two people
  missing in Taiwan.  Agricultural losses in the province were estimated
  to be at least NT$ 46.89 million.


  {Part VII} References (All in Chinese version)
  ==============================================

     http://www.nmc.gov.cn>              
     http://ncc.cma.gov.cn>              
     http://www.cwb.gov.tw>              
     http://www.zjwater.com>             
     http://www.shanghaiwater.gov.cn>    


  E. Huang Chunliang Report from Japan
  ------------------------------------

  {Part I}. Landfall
  ==================

     According to the JMA warnings, Severe Typhoon 0509 (MATSA) passed over
  the island of Ishigakijima, Okinawa Prefecture  from 0900 UTC (approx.)
  through 1200 UTC on the 4th of August with a MSW of 40 m/s and a CP of
  955 hPa.


  {Part II}. Meteorological Obs
  =============================

  Station        Min SLP (hPa)      Peak SW (m/s)     Peak Gust (m/s)
  ---------------------------------------------------------------------
  Miyakojima     971.6 [04/0933Z]   20.9 [04/1520Z]   40.3 [04/1335Z]
  Ishigakijima   958.1 [04/1046Z]   31.4 [04/1820Z]   50.6 [04/1704Z]
  Iriomotejima   963.4 [04/1246Z]   25.4 [--------]   40.9 [04/1756Z]
  Yonagunijima   972.8 [04/1615Z]   24.3 [04/1250Z]   37.1 [04/1327Z]


  Station                    Storm Total (mm)
  -----------------------------------------------------
  Miyakojima               318.0   [02/1500-05/0600Z]
  Ishigakijima             183.5   [02/1500-05/0600Z]
  Iriomotejima             284.0   [02/1500-05/0600Z]
  Yonagunijima             200.5   [02/1500-05/0600Z]
 
  Note:  Miyakojima   @ WMO47927, 24.79N/125.28E, Alt 40 m
         Ishigakijima @ WMO47918, 24.34N/124.16E, Alt  6 m
         Iriomotejima @ WMO47917, 24.39N/123.75E, Alt  9 m
         Yonagunijima @ WMO47912, 24.47N/123.01E, Alt 30 m


  F. Huang Chunliang Report from Korea
  ------------------------------------

  Rainfall observations--only 24-hr amount(s) >= 100 mm listed: 

  MASAN (35.18N/128.57E)           229.0 mm [07/12-08/12Z, Aug]
  JINJU (35.20N/128.12E)           107.0 mm [07/12-08/12Z, Aug]
  MASAN (35.18N/128.57E)           223.0 mm [08/00-09/00Z, Aug]
  JINJU (35.20N/128.12E)           122.0 mm [08/00-09/00Z, Aug]

  (Report written/compiled by Kevin Boyle and Huang Chunliang)



                             TYPHOON SANVU
                      (TC-10W / TY 0510 / HUANING)
                             9 - 14 August
            ------------------------------------------------

  Sanvu: contributed by Macao, is the Macanese word for coral, a hard
         substance often used for making jewelry, formed by the skeletons
         of tiny sea animals, massed together in great numbers.  Many
         Macao souvenirs are made of it.

  A. Storm Origins
  ----------------

     At 1430 UTC 8 August, an area of convection, located approximately 
  365 nm northwest of Palau, was first mentioned as a suspect area in a 
  STWO issued by JTWC.  A 08/0904 UTC QuikScat pass indicated an elongated
  LLCC while animated enhanced infrared imagery depicted cycling
  convection on the periphery of this circulation.  An upper-level analysis
  revealed a moderate vertical wind shear environment, weak divergence, and
  increasing 850-mb vorticity.  The system gradually consolidated and a
  TCFA was issued at 10/0000 UTC.       The first warning on Tropical
  Depression 10W was released at 10/1200 UTC, the centre being located
  approximately 500 nm east of Manila, Philippines.  At this time TD-10W
  was well within PAGASA's AOR, that agency having already assigned the
  name Huaning from their internal naming list.  Moving west-northwestward
  along the southern periphery of the subtropical ridge, TD-10W was
  upgraded to a tropical storm at 11/0000 UTC.  Following JMA's upgrade to
  tropical storm intensity at 11/1200 UTC, the tropical cyclone was named
  Sanvu.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     With the subtropical ridge firmly in place across the northwest 
  Pacific into eastern China, Tropical Storm Sanvu was foreordained to 
  track on a predominantly west-northwesterly track.  Sanvu/Huaning 
  remained a weak tropical storm through 11 August while clipping the 
  northeastern corner of Luzon, Philippines.  Satellite images showed 
  that the poleward outflow was being restricted due to subsidence 
  associated with the ridging to the north.  However, on 12 August Sanvu 
  began to intensify and was upgraded to a 65-kt typhoon--its peak 
  intensity--at 0000 UTC 13 August while located approximately 165 nm 
  east of Hong Kong, China.   By the time Sanvu made landfall near 
  Shantou, China, at around 13/0600 UTC, it had weakened to a 55-kt 
  tropical storm.  As it was dissipating as a significant tropical 
  cyclone over land, the final warning was issued by JTWC.  JMA 
  maintained Sanvu as a tropical storm until 14/0000 UTC when that agency 
  also released the final statement. 
 
     A peak intensity of 60 kts was estimated by both NMCC and HKO while 
  JMA and the Meteorological Department of Thailand estimated a MSW of 55 
  kts.  The minimum CP estimated by JMA was 985 mb.  The peak intensity 
  estimated by the CWB of Taiwan was 50 kts, which was also the highest 
  MSW per PAGASA's warnings while the storm was moving through their AOR.
 
     A graphic displaying the track of Typhoon Sanvu/Huaning may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_10W_SANVU.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Typhoon Sanvu brought strong winds and torrential rains to southern 
  China.  The winds brought down trees and sent billboards and telephone 
  boxes flying while torrential rains brought tremendous flooding.  The 
  floodwaters destroyed more than 2,500 houses, many bridges, and damaged 
  60,000 hectares (148,000 acres) of crops.  Two people were killed when 
  a two-metre wall at a construction site collapsed.


  D. Huang Chunliang Report from the Philippines
  ----------------------------------------------

     Rainfall observations--only 24-hr amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  TUGUEGARAO (WMO98233, 19.62N/121.73E)         307.5 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  LAOAG (WMO98223, 18.18N/120.53E)              124.2 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  IBA (WMO98324, 15.33N/119.97E)                120.6 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  BAGUIO (WMO98328, 16.42N/120.60E)             105.4 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  SAN JOSE (WMO98531, 12.35N/121.03E)           103.6 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  CASIGURAN (WMO98336, 16.28N/122.12E)          101.4 mm [11/00-12/00Z]
  SUBIC BAY WX STN (WMO98426, 14.80N/120.27E)   152.0 mm [12/00-13/00Z]
  IBA (WMO98324, 15.33N/119.97E)                130.6 mm [12/00-13/00Z]
  BAGUIO (WMO98328, 16.42N/120.60E)             118.0 mm [12/00-13/00Z]


  E. Huang Chunliang Report from China
  ------------------------------------

  (Editor's Note:  I have not yet received Chunliang's China report on
  Typhoon Sanvu.  It will be included as an addendum to a future summary.)

  (Report written and compiled by Kevin Boyle and Huang Chunliang)



                          SUPER TYPHOON MAWAR
                           (TC-11W / TY 0511)
                             19 - 29 August
                ---------------------------------------

  Mawar: contributed by Malaysia, is the rose--a common flowering garden
         plant with bigger-sized varieties found in the highlands of
         Malaysia

  A. Introduction and Storm Origins
  ---------------------------------

     Super Typhoon Mawar formed on 19 August, the same day that warnings 
  were first issued on Tropical Storm Guchol centred roughly 600 nm to 
  the east.  There was no evidence of any interaction between these two
  systems, largely due to their small size.  Whereas the upper-level
  outflow from Mawar interfered with the development of Tropical Storm
  Guchol, Mawar rapidly intensified, briefly attaining super typhoon
  intensity on 22 August.  Mawar went on to become the first typhoon to
  affect Japan in 2005.

     On 18 August an area of convection persisted approximately 170 nm 
  southeast of Iwo Jima.  It was included in JTWC's STWO, along with the 
  pre-Guchol disturbance, at 18/0600 UTC, when animated multi-spectral 
  satellite imagery depicted improving convection around a possible LLCC. 
  An upper-air analysis indicated that the system was located in a low to 
  moderate wind shear environment.   Further development led to the 
  issuance of a TCFA at 19/0530 UTC.  The first warning was issued at 
  19/1200 UTC on Tropical Depression 11W, located approximately 250 nm 
  south-southeast of Iwo Jima.  The system quickly strengthened and was 
  soon upgraded to a 45-kt tropical storm at 19/1800 UTC.  At the same 
  time JMA christened the tropical cyclone Mawar when their estimated MSW 
  (10-min avg) reached 35 kts.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     Initially embedded in a weak steering environment, Tropical Storm
  Mawar began a slow northwest drift on 20 August, influenced by a
  subtropical ridge situated to the northeast.  Mawar rapidly intensified
  into an 80-kt typhoon at 0000 UTC 21 August while passing approximately
  165 nm south of Iwo Jima.  Continuing slowly northwestwards, Mawar
  continued to strengthen quickly, reaching a peak intensity of 130 kts at
  22/0000 UTC.   Mawar was a super typhoon for only six hours before a
  steady weakening trend began on 22 August.  However, the system remained
  a major typhoon with MSW of 100-105 kts for the next two days, turning 
  northwards early on 24 August.  Typhoon Mawar recurved northeastwards 
  on 25 August as it was approaching the Japanese island of Honshu and 
  made landfall near Tokyo, Japan, at 25/1800 UTC with MSW of 85 kts. 
  Moving back out to sea, the tropical cyclone weakened to below typhoon 
  intensity at 26/1200 UTC and transitioned into an extratropical LOW at 
  27/0000 UTC, the time that JTWC issued the final warning.  JMA released 
  the last bulletin at 28/0000 UTC.  The extratropical gale had weakened
  into a 25-kt LOW near 38N/154W by 29/0600 UTC. 

     NMCC estimated a peak intensity of 110 kts while JMA and the CWB of 
  Taiwan estimated a maximum strength of 95 kts (all 10-min averages).  A
  minimum CP of 930 hPa was estimated by JMA.

     A graphic displaying the track of Super Typhoon Mawar may be found
  at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_11W_MAWAR.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Typhoon Mawar had a significant impact on Japan.  Press reports 
  indicate that one person was killed and seven injured after the storm 
  came ashore on 25 August.  News sources indicate that Shizuoka and 
  Chiba Prefectures were particularly hard hit.  Thousands of households 
  were left without power and hundreds of families were forced to 
  evacuate their homes after heavy rains, up to 610 mm in some areas, 
  triggered flooding and landslides.  Transportation was also badly 
  disrupted.  A total of 89 flights were cancelled while Japan's bullet 
  train service was suspended.  Offshore, Mawar temporarily forced the 
  suspension of vessel berthing operations at a number of oil refineries 
  in eastern Japan.


  D. Huang Chunliang Report from Japan
  ------------------------------------
  
  {Part I}. Landfall
  ==================

     According to the JMA warnings, after passing over Miura Peninsula
  around 25/1730 UTC with a MSW of 35 m/s and a CP of 970 hPa, Severe
  Typhoon 0511 (Mawar) made landfall near Chiba City, Chiba Prefecture,
  around 25/1930 UTC with a MSW of 35 m/s and a CP of 975 hPa.


  {Part II}. Meteorological Obs from Tokyo District Meteorological
             Observatory
  ================================================================

  Note 1: All the obs in this part were reported within the precinct of
  Tokyo District Meteorological Observatory, including the prefectures of
  Niigata, Toyama, Ishikawa, Fukui, Ibaraki, Gumma, Tochigi, Saitama,
  Tokyo, Chiba, Kanagawa, Yamanashi, Nagano, Shizuoka, Gifu, Aichi and Mie.

  Note 2: "*" = record-breaking value for relevant station.


  1. Top-5 Daily Rainfall [24/1500-25/1500Z] Obs
  ----------------------------------------------

  Ranking    Prefecture        Station           Rainfall (mm)
  -------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Kanagawa          Hakone            528*
  02         Shizuoka          Yugashima         364
  03         Shizuoka          Amagisan          362
  04         Shizuoka          Gotenba           281
  05         Tokyo             Ojima             266


  2. Top-5 Peak Sustained Wind (10-min avg) Obs
  ---------------------------------------------

  Ranking    Station                                      Peak wind (mps)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Miyake-tsubota, Tokyo (JMA44228, Alt 20m)    28   [25/1120Z]
  02         Omaezaki, Shizuoka (WMO47655, Alt 45m)       24.7 [25/1050Z]
  03         Ojima, Tokyo (WMO47675, Alt 74m)             24.4 [25/1550Z]
  04         Choshi, Chiba (WMO47648, Alt 20m)            22.0 [25/2220Z]
  05         Katsuura, Chiba (WMO47674, Alt 12m)          21.0 [25/1900Z]
  05         Niijima, Tokyo (JMA44206, Alt 9m)            21   [25/1520Z]


  3. Top-5 Peak Gust Obs
  ----------------------

  Ranking    Station                                      Peak wind (mps)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Ojima, Tokyo (WMO47675, Alt 74m)             57.0*[25/1441Z]
  02         Omaezaki, Shizuoka (WMO47655, Alt 45m)       45.7 [25/1106Z]
  03         Irouzaki, Shizuoka (WMO47666, Alt 55m)       41.9 [25/1440Z]
  04         Mishima, Shizuoka (WMO47657, Alt 21m)        39.9 [25/1226Z]
  05         Choshi, Chiba (WMO47648, Alt 20m)            39.6 [25/2113Z]


  4. Top-5 SLP Obs (lowest)
  -------------------------

  Ranking    Station                             Min SLP (hPa)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Irouzaki, Shizuoka (WMO47666)       977.9 [25/1256Z]
  02         Ojima, Tokyo (WMO47675)             983.7 [25/1506Z]
  03         Ajiro, Shizuoka (WMO47668)          984.2 [25/1500Z]
  04         Chiba, Chiba (WMO47682)             985.8 [25/1925Z]
  04         Omaezaki, Shizuoka (WMO47655)       985.8 [25/1105Z]

  
  {Part III} References (Japanese version only)
  =============================================

     http://www.tokyo-jma.go.jp/sub_index/bosai/disaster/ty0511/ty0511_kanku.pdf>

  (Report written/compiled by Kevin Boyle and Huang Chunliang)



                         TROPICAL STORM GUCHOL
                          (TC-12W / STS 0512)
                             19 - 26 August
               -----------------------------------------

  Guchol: contributed by Micronesia, is the Yapese word for the spice
          turmeric

  A. Storm Origins
  ----------------

     The disturbance which eventually developed into Tropical Storm Guchol
  began as an area of convection approximately 870 nm east of Iwo Jima.
  It was first mentioned in JTWC's STWO at 0930 UTC 17 August when animated
  multi-spectral satellite imagery revealed increasing deep convection in
  association with a weak LLCC.  An upper-level analysis indicated that the
  suspect area was located within a favourable low wind shear environment.
  However, the deep convection remained cyclic in nature before properly
  consolidating on 19 August.  This development prompted the issuance of a
  TCFA at 19/2130 UTC.  Shortly afterward, the first warning was released
  at 20/0000 UTC, locating the centre of the newly formed Tropical
  Depression 12W approximately 540 nm east of Iwo Jima.  Drifting slowly 
  westwards, the system maintained MSW of 25 to 30 kts on 20 August.  It
  was upgraded to a 40-kt tropical storm at 21/0000 UTC, and named Guchol
  six hours later when JMA raised their MSW to 35 kts. 


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     On 21 August Tropical Storm Guchol turned towards the north-northwest
  as it tracked along the southwest periphery of the subtropical ridge.
  Animated multi-spectral satellite imagery depicted a fully-exposed LLCC
  with the deep convection located to the south as a consequence of
  shearing associated with the upper-level outflow from the nearby Typhoon
  Mawar, located roughly 600 nm to the west.  Despite this negating factor,
  Guchol gradually intensified and reached its peak intensity of 60 kts,
  the storm's first maximum, at 0000 UTC 22 August while located
  approximately 330 nm east-northeast of Iwo Jima.   Tracking north-
  northwestward, Guchol began to weaken, the MSW leveling out at 50-kts
  at 22/1800 UTC.  Recurving sharply northeastwards, Tropical Storm Guchol
  began to pull away from Typhoon Mawar on 23 August.  Accelerating, the
  storm slowly re-intensified, arriving at its maximum strength of 60 kts
  for the second time at 24/0600 UTC.  Continuing northeastward, Guchol
  weakened and transformed into an extratropical cyclone at 25/0000 UTC,
  JTWC issuing the last warning at this time.  JMA released their final
  bulletin at 25/1200 UTC.    The LOW continued east-northeastward, 
  weakening to 25 kts by 26/1800.

     Both JMA and the CWB of Taiwan estimated a peak intensity of 55 kts
  while the highest MSW estimated by NMCC was 50 kts.  (This is a rare
  example of a case where NMCC's peak MSW is lower than JMA's.)

     A graphic displaying the track of Tropical Storm Guchol may be found
  at the following link:

   http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_12W_GUCHOL.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     There were no damages or casualties known to have been associated 
  with Tropical Storm Guchol.

  (Report written by Kevin Boyle)



                             TYPHOON TALIM
                      (TC-13W / TY 0513 / ISANG)
                        26 August - 2 September
            ----------------------------------------------

  Talim: contributed by the Philippines, means 'sharp' or 'cutting edge'

  A. Introduction and Storm Origins
  ---------------------------------

     Forming in the monsoon trough during late August, Talim followed a 
  northwestward to westward track for several days, peaking as an intense 
  125-kt typhoon on 29 August.  Typhoon Talim was the second tropical 
  cyclone of typhoon intensity to strike the island of Taiwan this year, 
  following Super Typhoon Haitang (TC-05W) in mid-July.  The storm also 
  had severe implications in mainland China where it caused flooding and
  the loss of 110 lives. 

     The origins of Typhoon Talim could be traced back to an area of 
  convection which developed and persisted approximately 250 nm east-
  northeast of Guam.  It was first mentioned as a suspect area in JTWC's 
  STWO issued at 0600 UTC 24 August when animated multi-spectral imagery 
  revealed a broad LLCC associated with the disturbance.  An upper-level 
  analysis revealed a low to moderate wind shear environment.  However, 
  an upper-level LOW was impinging on the outflow on the northern side of 
  the circulation.  Despite this, the potential for development of a 
  significant tropical cyclone was raised to 'good' at 25/2200 UTC and a 
  TCFA issued.  The first warning was released at 26/0600 UTC when 
  Tropical Depression 13W was located approximately 100 nm west-southwest 
  of Guam.  It was upgraded to a 35-kt tropical storm by both JTWC and 
  JMA at 27/0000 UTC, the tropical cyclone being assigned the name Talim.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     Tropical Storm Talim steadily intensified on 27 August as it moved on
  a general northwestward track along the southwestern periphery of a sub-
  tropical ridge.  The tropical cyclone was raised to typhoon intensity
  at 0600 UTC 28 August when it was located approximately 690 nm south-
  east of Okinawa.  At this time, PAGASA christened the tropical cyclone
  Isang after the storm had entered their AOR.  (Note: Even though the
  name Talim was contributed to the international list by the Philippines,
  PAGASA always applies a name from their alphabetical list of local
  names for all systems entering their AOR.)   Typhoon Talim continued
  to strengthen on 28 August while moving on a more westward heading
  and reached a peak intensity of 125 kts at 29/1800 UTC.    After 
  maintaining this strength for nearly 24 hours, a weakening trend began 
  late on 30 August as the storm approached the island of Taiwan.  
  Typhoon Talim made landfall near Hualien, Taiwan, at 31/1800 UTC with a 
  MSW of 95 kts.  From there, the cyclone crossed the Taiwan Strait and 
  came ashore near Fuzhou, China, around 01/0600 UTC, the same time that 
  it was downgraded to a 55-kt tropical storm.  JTWC issued the final 
  warning at 01/1200 UTC while JMA continued to maintain the system as a
  tropical storm, downgrading Talim to a tropical depression at 02/0600
  UTC.  The last statement issued by JMA was at 02/1800 UTC.

     NMCC estimated a peak intensity of 130 kts while the CWB of Taiwan 
  estimated a peak intensity of 105 kts.  JMA, PAGASA and HKO all 
  estimated a maximum intensity of 95 kts.  The lowest CP estimated by 
  JMA was 925 mb.  (All the Asian TCWCs MSW estimates should be understood
  as representing a 10-min averaging period.)

     A graphic displaying the track of Typhoon Talim/Isang may be found at
  the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_13W_TALIM.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Typhoon Talim killed at least seven people and injured 59 more as it 
  tracked across the island of Taiwan.  Schools, financial markets and 
  government offices were closed and hundreds of villagers were evacuated 
  from mountainous regions.  Transportation was badly affected.  Train 
  services were suspended and all domestic flights were cancelled. 
  International air services were also delayed.  Several roads were cut 
  off in Hsinchu County while in Taichung County, a bridge at Kukuan was
  submerged by flash floods, prompting the evacuation of hundreds of
  tourists.  Taiwan's Formosa Petrochemical Company temporarily suspended
  berthing operations at its Mai Liao refinery.
 
     Talim's strong winds cut power supplies and downed trees while heavy 
  rain triggered flooding in some towns in central Taiwan.  Around 1.7 
  million people lost power and some 48,500 households were without 
  running water. In the capital of Taipei, streets were abandoned as 
  strong winds brought down trees and blew debris against buildings and 
  homes. 

     News reports indicate that Typhoon Talim left at least 110 people dead
  in eastern mainland China, 40 of those believed to have perished in 
  landslides in Anhui province.  More than 150,000 people were evacuated, 
  and thousands of homes were damaged or destroyed. 


  D. Huang Chunliang Report from Japan
  ------------------------------------

     The following observations were obtained from the Okinawa Meteor-
  ological Observatory, Japan Meteorology Agency:

     http://www.okinawa-jma.go.jp>

  Station        Min SLP (hPa)      Peak SW (m/s)     Peak Gust (m/s)
  ---------------------------------------------------------------------
  Miyakojima     988.6 [31/0550Z]   17.1 [30/2320Z]   34.7 [31/0101Z]
  Ishigakijima   971.6 [31/0705Z]   34.1 [31/0750Z]   59.1 [31/0734Z]
  Iriomotejima   969.2 [31/1005Z]   31.6 [31/0750Z]   54.6 [31/0749Z]
  Yonagunijima   965.8 [31/1207Z]   38.2 [31/1200Z]   57.8 [31/1207Z]

  Station        Peak Daily Rainfall (mm)
  -----------------------------------------
  Miyakojima      22.5 [30/1500-31/1500Z]
  Ishigakijima   132.5 [30/1500-31/1500Z]
  Iriomotejima   152.5 [30/1500-31/1500Z]
  Yonagunijima   134.0 [31/1500-01/1500Z]

  Note:  Miyakojima @ WMO47927, 24.79N/125.28E, Alt 40 m
         Ishigakijima @ WMO47918, 24.34N/124.16E, Alt  6 m
         Iriomotejima @ WMO47917, 24.39N/123.75E, Alt  9 m
         Yonagunijima @ WMO47912, 24.47N/123.01E, Alt 30 m


  E. Huang Chunliang Report from China
  ------------------------------------

  (Editor's Note:  I have not yet received Chunliang's China report on
  Typhoon Talim.  It will be included as an addendum to a future summary.)

  (Report written/compiled by Kevin Boyle and Huang Chunliang)



                           SUPER TYPHOON NABI
                      (TC-14W / TY 0514 / JOLINA)
                        29 August - 11 September
            -----------------------------------------------

  Nabi: contributed by South Korea, means 'butterfly'

  A. Introduction and Storm Origins
  ---------------------------------

     The third super typhoon of the year, Nabi followed a classic 
  recurvature path, passing through the Marianas on 31 August, ultimately 
  becoming the second tropical cyclone to make landfall on Japanese soil 
  in 2005. 

     Super Typhoon Nabi began as a persistent area of convection 
  approximately 560 nm east of Guam.  It was first mentioned in a STWO 
  issued by JTWC at 1900 UTC 28 August when enhanced infrared animations 
  and water vapor satellite imagery revealed a large region of deep 
  convection associated with the disturbance.  However, a 28/1244 UTC 
  TRMM microwave pass indicated that the deep convection was located
  mainly within the western and southern quadrants.  The system quickly 
  developed as it moved slowly west to west-southwestward through a 
  moderate wind shear environment.  A TCFA was issued at 29/0200 UTC and 
  was soon replaced by the first warning at 29/0600 UTC.   At this time 
  the centre of Tropical Depression 14W was located approximately 520 nm 
  east-northeast of Guam and tracking towards the west at around 6 kts 
  along the southern periphery of a mid-level steering ridge located 
  southeast of Japan.  TD-14W steadily intensified and was upgraded to a 
  40-kt tropical storm at 29/1800 UTC, the storm having already been 
  named Nabi six hours earlier after JMA had raised their 10-min avg MSW
  to 40-kts.


  B. Track and Intensity History
  ------------------------------

     Tropical Storm Nabi continued to strengthen as it tracked westward 
  towards the Marianas and was upgraded to Typhoon Nabi at 1200 UTC
  30 August while located approximately 130 nm east-southeast of Saipan. 
  Turning onto a west-northwesterly course, Nabi continued to intensify 
  while passing through the Marianas on 31 August, the centre passing
  35 nm northeast of Saipan at 31/1200 UTC.  Intensification continued, 
  culminating in the storm's reaching its peak intensity of 140 kts at 
  01/1800 UTC.  Some weakening occurred but Nabi maintained super typhoon 
  intensity through 2 September as it entered the far northeast portion 
  of PAGASA's AOR.  The Filipino name for this tropical cyclone was 
  Jolina. 

    Moving northwestward Nabi was downgraded to a typhoon early on
  3 September, and after weakening further, the MSW leveled out at 105 kts
  later that day.  An approaching mid-level trough exiting eastern China 
  caused the steering ridge to retreat eastwards, inducing Typhoon Nabi 
  to turn to a progressively northward path.   In the meantime, Nabi
  re-intensified and reached a secondary peak of 115 kts at 0000 UTC
  5 September while located approximately 310 nm south-southeast of Sasebo,
  Japan.  Accelerating northwards, Typhoon Nabi made landfall on the 
  Japanese island of Kyushu at 06/0000 UTC with a MSW of 90 kts.  The 
  tropical cyclone then crossed southwestern Japan on 6 September and 
  recurved into the Sea of Japan, completing extratropical transition at 
  06/1800 UTC, the time that JTWC issued the final warning.  JMA 
  downgraded Nabi to a tropical storm at 07/0000 UTC and maintained this 
  intensity until the issuance of their last bulletin at 08/0600 UTC, 
  shortly after the cyclone had crossed northern Hokkaido and was 
  speeding eastward across the North Pacific.  JMA carried the 
  extratropical remnants of Nabi in their high seas warnings through
  11/1800 UTC.  The extratropical LOW had by this time turned northward 
  and passed through the Aleutian Islands and was a 35-kt gale situated
  in the central Bering Sea.

     NMCC estimated a peak intensity of 120 kts while the CWB of Taiwan 
  estimated a MSW of 105 kts (10-min averages).  The maximum strength per
  PAGASA warnings during the time that Nabi/Jolina was tracking through
  that agency's AOR was 95 kts.  The highest peak intensity estimated by
  JMA was 95 kts and the lowest CP was 925 mb.  HKO did not issue any
  warnings on this system.

     A graphic displaying the track of Super Typhoon Nabi/Jolina may be
  found at the following link:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_14W_NABI_OVER.gif>

     A graphic with better resolution depicting the track only up to the
  point of extratropical transition may be found at:

     http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/tc_besttracks_graphics/PACIFIC_WEST/2005_14W_NABI.gif>


  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Typhoon Nabi had a significant impact on southern Japan.  According to
  press reports, 32 people were killed and 140 injured.  At least 270,000 
  households were without electricity and around 10,000 buildings were 
  damaged. 

     Transportation was badly disrupted by the heavy rains and strong
  winds.  Hundreds of flights and ferries in and out of Kyushu and Shikoku
  were cancelled while all the West Japan Railway Company's train services
  were suspended. 
  
     Industry was also badly hit.  The car assembly plants in southwestern 
  Japan at Honda Motor Company, Toyota Motor Corporation, Nissan Motor 
  Company and Mazda Motor Corporation were temporarily halted.   Mitsubishi
  Heavy Industries closed ship building plants in Nagasaki, Yamaguchi and
  Hiroshima while the oil refiner Kyushu Oil Company, Japan Energy and
  Idemitsu Kosan Company also halted operations.

     Torrential rains caused widespread flooding.  Parts of Miyazaki 
  received more than 1,000 mm (40 inches) of rain while 800 mm (32 inches)
  was recorded in Kagoshima and Oita.  Tokyo and surrounding areas also
  experienced heavy rainfall.  More than 230 mm (9 inches) fell in the
  capital city in one hour.
 
     The General Insurance Association of Japan estimated overall insured 
  losses of 58.8 billion yen (535 million US dollars), the tenth most 
  expensive typhoon on record.
 
     Typhoon Nabi also affected South Korea.  In Busan, strong winds blew 
  down dozens of signboards and uprooted trees.  Up to 152 mm (6 inches) 
  of rain was recorded in the city.  A Vietnamese cargo ship, the Long 
  Xuyen, ran aground in the port city of Pohang.  Press reports indicated 
  that five people were missing but there appears to have been no deaths.
  
     There are no reports of damages or casualties in the Marianas.  Saipan
  endured sustained winds of up to 65 kts while nearby Guam experienced 
  tropical storm force winds and 76 mm (3 inches) of rain.  According to
  some information sent by Huang Chunliang, the NWS office at Agana, Guam,
  (13.5N/144.8E) recorded 118.4 mm (4.66 inches) during the 24 hours
  between 30/1200 and 31/1200 UTC.


  D. Huang Chunliang Report from Japan
  ------------------------------------

  Note: "*" = record-breaking values for relevant stations.


  {Part I}. Landfalls (based on the JMA warnings)
  ===============================================

  1. Severe Typhoon 0514 (Nabi) passed over Amakusa-shimoshima Island, 
     Kumamoto Prefecture, around 06/0400 UTC.

  2. Severe Typhoon 0514 (Nabi) made landfall near Isahaya City, Nagasaki 
     Prefecture, around 06/0500 UTC with a MSW of 35 m/s and a CP of
     960 hPa.

  3. Typhoon 0514 (Nabi) made landfall over Hokkaido's Oshima Peninsula
     near Setana Town around 07/1430Z with a MSW of 25 m/s and a CP of
     985 hPa.


  {Part II}. Top-5 Storm Total [03/1500-08/1500Z] Obs
  ===================================================

  Ranking    Prefecture        Station           Rainfall (mm)
  -------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Miyazaki          Mikado            1321
  02         Miyazaki          Ebino             1307
  03         Miyazaki          Mitate            1201#
  04         Miyazaki          Wanitsukayama      995
  05         Miyazaki          Morotsuka          986

  Note (#): observed in 03/1500-06/2200Z.


  {Part III}. Top-5 Daily Rainfall Obs
  ====================================

  Ranking    Prefecture        Station           Rainfall (mm)
  ----------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Ehime             Jojushya         *757 [05/1500-06/1500Z]
  02         Kochi             Hongawa          *713 [05/1500-06/1500Z]
  03         Kochi             Ikegawa          *644 [05/1500-06/1500Z]
  04         Miyazaki          Ebino             639 [05/1500-06/1500Z]
  05         Miyazaki          Mikado           *628 [05/1500-06/1500Z]

  Note 1: During 04/1500-05/1500Z, 17 stations (11 in Miyazaki, 5 in
  Kagoshima and 1 in Oita) reported record-breaking daily rainfalls (for
  relevant stations).

  Note 2: During 05/1500-06/1500Z, 40 stations (7 in Kochi, 7 in Yamaguchi,
  7 in Oita, 5 in Hiroshima, 5 in Ehime, 3 in Miyazaki, 2 in Fukuoka, 2 in
  Tokushima, 1 in Shimane, and 1 in Kumamoto) reported record-breaking
  daily rainfalls (for relevant stations).

  Note 3: During 06/1500-07/1500Z, 4 stations (all in Hokkaido) reported 
  record-breaking daily rainfalls (for relevant stations).


  {Part IV}. Top-5 1-hr Rainfall Obs
  ==================================

  Ranking    Prefecture        Station           Rainfall (mm)
  ---------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Kochi             Hongawa          *76 [06/0920-06/1020Z]
  02         Nagasaki          Unzendake         75 [05/0340-06/0440Z]
  03         Shizuoka          Iwata            *73 [04/2000-04/2100Z]
  04         Miyazaki          Mikado            71 [05/2330-06/0030Z]
  05         Tokushima         Fukuharaasahi     69 [06/1150-06/1250Z]


  {Part V}. Top-5 Peak Sustained Wind (10-min avg) Obs
  ====================================================

  Ranking    Station                                      Peak wind (mps)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Kikaijima, Kagoshima (JMA88851, Alt 5m)     *36   [05/0550Z]
  02         Murotomisaki, Kochi (WMO47899, Alt 185m)     33.2 [06/1440Z]
  03         Tobishima, Yamagata (JMA35002, Alt 58m)      33   [07/1200Z]
  04         Minamidaitojima, Okinawa (WMO47945, 15m)     32.8 [04/1020Z]
  05         Yakushima, Kagoshima (WMO47836, Alt 36m)     32.2 [06/1220Z]


  {Part VI}. Top-5 Peak Gust Obs
  ==============================

  Ranking    Station                                      Peak wind (mps)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Tanegashima, Kagoshima (WMO47837, Alt 17m)   59.2 [05/1934Z]
  02         Yakushima, Kagoshima (WMO47836, Alt 36m)     58.1 [05/1529Z]
  03         Minamidaitojima, Okinawa (WMO47945, 15m)     55.6 [04/1132Z]
  04         Kagoshima, Kagoshima (WMO47827, Alt 4m)      48.4 [05/1207Z]
  05         Makurazaki, Kagoshima (WMO47831, Alt 30m)    48.3 [05/2034Z]


  {Part VII}. Top-5 SLP Obs (lowest)
  ==================================

  Ranking    Station                               Min SLP (hPa)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------
  01         Minamidaitojima, Okinawa (WMO47945)  *936.8 [04/0605Z]
  02         Yakushima, Kagoshima (WMO47836)       949.4 [05/1908Z]
  03         Makurazaki, Kagoshima (WMO47831)      952.0 [05/2153Z]
  04         Kagoshima, Kagoshima (WMO47827)       956.0 [05/2355Z]
  05         Akune, Kagoshima (WMO47823)           957.3 [06/0202Z]


  {Part VIII} References (Japanese versions only)
  ===============================================

     http://www.data.kishou.go.jp/etrn/index.html>
     http://www.data.kishou.go.jp/mdrr/rank_update/index.html>
     http://www.data.kishou.go.jp/bosai/report/new/jyun_sokuji20050904-08.pdf>
     http://www.okinawa-jma.go.jp/new/2005/T0514.pdf>
     http://www.fukuoka-jma.go.jp/emr1/T14explanation.pdf>
     http://www.osaka-jma.go.jp/saigai/pdf/h17/sokuji/T0514.pdf>
     http://www.tokyo-jma.go.jp/sub_index/bosai/disaster/ty0514/ty0514_kanku.pdf>
     http://www.sapporo-jma.go.jp/sp/kanku/sp_sub09/data/sp_press050912.pdf>


  E. Huang Chunliang Report from Korea
  ------------------------------------

     Rainfall observations--only 24-hr amount(s) >= 100 mm listed:

  DAEGWALLYEONG (37.68N/128.77E)         139.0 mm [05/12-06/12Z, Sep]
  DAEGWALLYEONG (37.68N/128.77E)         211.5 mm [06/00-07/00Z, Sep]
  DONGHAE RADAR (37.50N/129.13E)         154.5 mm [05/12-06/12Z, Sep]
  DONGHAE RADAR (37.50N/129.13E)         241.5 mm [06/00-07/00Z, Sep]
  ULJIN (36.98N/129.42E)                 135.5 mm [05/12-06/12Z, Sep]
  ULJIN (36.98N/129.42E)                 182.5 mm [06/00-07/00Z, Sep]
  ULSAN (35.55N/129.32E)                 319.0 mm [05/12-06/12Z, Sep]
  ULSAN (35.55N/129.32E)                 275.5 mm [06/00-07/00Z, Sep]
  ULLEUNGDO (37.48N/130.90E)             118.0 mm [06/12-07/12Z, Sep]

  (Report written/compiled by Kevin Boyle and Huang Chunliang)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTH INDIAN OCEAN (NIO) - Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

  Activity for August:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTHWEST INDIAN OCEAN (SWI) - South Indian Ocean West of Longitude 90E

  Activity for August:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST AUSTRALIA/SOUTHEAST INDIAN OCEAN (AUW) - From 90E to 135E

  Activity for August:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST AUSTRALIA/CORAL SEA (AUE) - From 135E to 160E

  Activity for August:  No tropical cyclones


                       Northeast Australia/Coral Sea
                       Tropical Activity for August
                       -----------------------------

     The Brisbane TCWC issued gale warnings on 9 August for a LOW which at
  09/1000 UTC was located near 14S/155E, moving slowly eastward.  Gales of
  35-40 kts were forecast for the southeastern sector of the LOW up until
  10/0000 UTC, when the gale warning was cancelled.  This system was never
  referred to as a tropical LOW, even though it was in the tropics, but
  given the time of year was likely non-tropical or hybrid at best.  The
  gales were no doubt due to a tight pressure gradient with a HIGH to the
  south or southeast.

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTH PACIFIC (SPA) - South Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 160E

  Activity for August:  No tropical cyclones


                 South Pacific Tropical Activity for August
                 ------------------------------------------

     No tropical cyclones formed in the South Pacific east of 160E during
  August, but the Fiji TCWC did issue gale warnings on a system which was
  referred to as a depression.  This LOW was located on 25 August well to
  the east of Tahiti and quickly moved off to the east-southeast, the last
  warning being issued at 26/0600 UTC.  Gales to 40 kts were forecast from
  the northern quadrant around the eastern side to the southwestern sector.
  This depression was never referred to as a tropical depression so
  undoubtedly was non-tropical or hybrid in character.

  *************************************************************************

         SPECIAL FEATURE - SOURCES OF TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION

     The purpose of this section is to list some websites where many and
  varied types of tropical cyclone information are archived.  Many readers
  will know about these already, but for the benefit of those who don't,
  I wanted to include them. 

  (1) Aircraft Reconnaissance Information
  ---------------------------------------

     Various types of messages from reconnaissance aircraft may be
  retrieved from the following FTP site:

     ftp://ftp.nhc.noaa.gov/pub/products/nhc/recon/>

     Information regarding how to interpret the coded reconnaissance
  messages may be found at the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/reconlist.shtml>

  Links are also included to websites with further information about the
  U. S. Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron and the NOAA Air-
  craft Operations Center.

  (2) Archived Advisories
  -----------------------

     All the advisory products (public advisories, forecast/advisories,
  strike probabilities, discussions, various graphics) issued by TPC/NHC
  are archived on TPC's website.  For the current year (using 2004 as an
  example), the archived products can be found at:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2004/index.shtml>

  Links to tropical products archives for earlier years are available at
  the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml>

  JTWC warnings for past storms are archived on the NRL Monterry website:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.

     I am not aware at the moment of any other TCWC which archives all
  its tropical cyclone warning/advisory products for public access, but
  if I learn of any, I will add them to this list.

  (3) Satellite Imagery
  ---------------------

     Satellite images of tropical cyclones in various sensor bands are
  available on the NRL Monterrey and University of Wisconsin websites,
  courtesy of Jeff Hawkins and Chris Velden and their associates.  The
  links are:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

     http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/tropic/tropic.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.  For the CIMSS site, a link to data archives is 
  located in the lower left portion of the screen.

     Additional tropical satellite imagery, along with looping ability for
  composite microwave imagery for the Western Hemisphere north of the
  equator, can be found at:

  (1) For the Eastern North Pacific:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-epac.html>

  (2) For the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-atl.html>

     I'm sure there are other sites with available imagery available, and
  as I learn of them, I will add the links to this list.

  *************************************************************************

                              EXTRA FEATURE

     In order to shorten the amount of typing in preparing the narrative
  material, I have been in the habit of freely using abbreviations and
  acronyms.   I have tried to define most of these with the first usage
  in a given summary, but I may have missed one now and then.  Most of
  these are probably understood by a majority of readers but perhaps a
  few aren't clear to some.  To remedy this I developed a Glossary of
  Abbreviations and Acronyms which I first included in the August, 1998
  summary.  I don't normally include the Glossary in most months in
  order to help keep them from being too long.  If anyone would like to
  receive a copy of the Glossary, please e-mail me and I'll be happy
  to send them a copy.

  *************************************************************************

  AUTHOR'S NOTE:  This summary should be considered a very preliminary 
  overview of the tropical cyclones that occur in each month. The cyclone
  tracks (provided separately) will generally be based upon operational
  warnings issued by the various tropical cyclone warning centers.  The
  information contained therein may differ somewhat from the tracking and
  intensity information obtained from a "best-track" file which is based
  on a detailed post-seasonal analysis of all available data. Information
  on where to find official "best-track" files from the various warning
  centers will be passed along from time to time.

    The track files are not being sent via e-mail.  They can be retrieved
  from the archive sites listed below.  (Note: I do have a limited e-mail
  distribution list for the track files.    If anyone wishes to receive
  these via e-mail, please send me a message.)

    Both the summaries and the track files are standard text files
  created in DOS editor.  Download to disk and use a viewer such as
  Notepad or DOS editor to view the files.

     The first summary in this series covered the month of October,
  1997.   Back issues can be obtained from the following websites
  (courtesy of Michael Bath, Michael V. Padua, Michael Pitt, Chris
  Landsea, and John Diebolt):

    http://australiasevereweather.com/cyclones/>
    http://www.typhoon2000.ph>
    http://mpittweather.com>
    ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/landsea/padgett/>
    http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/>


     Another website where much information about tropical cyclones may
  be found is the website for the UK Meteorological Office.  Their site
  contains a lot of statistical information about tropical cyclones
  globally on a monthly basis.  The URL is:

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/tropicalcyclone>
    

                    TROPICAL CYCLONE REPORTS AVAILABLE

     JTWC now has available on its website the Annual Tropical Cyclone
  Report (ATCR) for 2004 (2003-2004 season for the Southern Hemisphere).
  ATCRs for earlier years are available also.

     The URL is:  http://199.10.200.33/jtwc.html>

     Also, TPC/NHC has available on its webpage nice "technicolor"
  tracking charts for the 2004 Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific
  tropical cyclones; also, storm reports for all the 2004 Atlantic
  and Eastern North Pacific cyclones are now available, as well as
  track charts and reports on storms from earlier years. 

     The URL is:  http://www.nhc.noaa.gov>


     A special thanks to Michael Bath of McLeans Ridges, New South Wales,
  Australia, for assisting me with proofreading the summaries.


  PREPARED BY

  Gary Padgett
  E-mail:  garyp@alaweb.com
  Phone:  334-222-5327

  Kevin Boyle  (Northwest Pacific Basin)
  E-mail:  newchapelobservatory@btinternet.com

  Huang Chunliang  (Assistance with Northwest Pacific Basin)
  E-mail:  huangchunliang@hotmail.com

  Simon Clarke  (Northeast Australia/Coral Sea, South Pacific Basin)
  E-mail:  scla4255@bigpond.net.au

  *************************************************************************
  *************************************************************************

Document: summ0508.htm
Updated: 3rd December, 2005

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